RI DDD Forum Sept. 11 To Feature Q & A With Olmstead Consent Decree Monitor

(The date for the forum initially was incorrect in the headline for this article. It has been corrected.) 

By Gina Macris

Moseley headshot 2016.JPG

The independent federal court monitor overseeing Rhode Island’s compliance with the integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act is scheduled to make a rare public appearance outside the courtroom  – by video conference – Sept. 11 at a quarterly community forum in East Providence sponsored by the state Division of Developmental  Disabilities (DDD).   

According to a DDD announcement, the monitor, Charles Moseley (pictured at left). The forum will focus on employment–related issues, including what it means to make an “informed choice” about work, and how someone who chooses not to work can apply for a  variance to the employment first  policy.

The Sept. 11 meeting will be at the East Providence Senior Center, 610 Waterman Ave., from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

The 2014 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice requires the state to de-segregate daytime work and non-work services for adults with developmental disabilities over a 10 year period to comply with the integration mandate embodied in Title II of the ADA.

The integration mandate was re-affirmed by the Olmstead decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1999, which involved two plaintiffs with developmental disabilities who had been held in a Georgia mental hospital for years after their treatment concluded because of a dearth of housing in the community.  

Rhode Island’s was the first Olmstead consent decree in the nation – but not the last - that addressed the integration of daytime activities for adults with developmental disabilities.  Earlier agreements which drew their authority from the same `High Court decision focused on segregated housing.  

RI Gov Pledges To Support "Current Level" Of DD Services In FY 19; No Fiscal Details Yet

By Gina Macris

Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo says her administration is committed to maintaining “the current level of services” for adults with developmental disabilities in order to meet the demands of a 2014 consent decree between the state and federal government.

But in a letter to a federal court monitor in the consent decree case, the governor did not spell out how much money the administration believes the state should spend.

The consent decree is a 2014 agreement between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) which requires Rhode Island to correct violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act by enabling adults with intellectual or developmental challenges to seek competitive employment and enjoy community-based, integrated non-work activities.

In the letter to the monitor, Raimondo wrote: “I will continue to work collaboratively with the General Assembly on all funding recommendations, including those supporting efforts under the Consent Decree.”  

Following better-than-expected revenue projections issued May 10, both House and Senate leaders said that at a minimum, they support restoration of an $18.4 million reduction in reimbursements to private service providers that Raimondo has proposed for the budget cycle beginning July 1.

The consent decree monitor, Charles Moseley, had sought three specific assurances from Raimondo, in the form of a letter or statement to U.S. District Court Judge John J. McConnell Jr.

Moseley asked that the letter or statement say that the budget would:

  •  “be re-set to reflect current FY 2018 expenditure and service levels”
  •  “continue to be revised throughout FY 2019 as needed to fully fund the provision of services”           consistent with requirements of the consent decree
  •  provide “sufficient personnel resources” to the Division of Developmental Disabilities to   “carry out  quality improvement activities consistent with Consent Decree requirements.”

Raimondo’s letter to Moseley, dated May 14, contains no details about any budget changes she may be planning. Nor does it mention quality improvement activities. 

On May 18, a spokeswoman for Raimondo said that “increasing funding for developmental disability support services is one shared priority for which she (the governor) continues to advocate as we further engage in discussions with the General Assembly about the final budget."

Asked whether the governor supports the employment of adults with disabilities as one of the state's workforce solutions, the governor's spokeswoman pointed out the new Real Pathways RI program. It is a workforce investment initiative that focuses on job-seekers who face various barriers to employment. Among the public, private, and non-profit organizations that participate in the program are four providers of developmental disability services, who are working with Home Depot and CVS to match their clients to jobs. 

Moseley had requested a statement from the governor on her position as he prepared to make recommendations to McConnell about what court action, if any, might be needed to ensure that compliance with the consent decree moves forward.

At the most recent court hearing April 10, the judge directed Moseley to find out if there was consensus among state officials and DOJ lawyers about a course of action the court might take to ensure enough funding. Failing such an agreement, McConnell said, he would hold an evidentiary hearing to lay the groundwork for a court order.

Moseley has concluded that Raimondo’s proposed budget, as it now stands, is insufficient to continue to support the modest salary increases to direct support workers put forward by Raimondo and approved by the General Assembly in the last two years. In addition, it would not allow the state to “continue services at current levels,” he said.

The monitor described his efforts to get a sense of the state’s position a  letter to Eric Beane, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, dated May 9. That was a day before the state’s revenue estimating conference concluded that revenues were projected to exceed previous estimates by $135 million through the end of Fiscal 2019.

A week earlier, on May 2, the director of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) did not dispute the monitor’s conclusions about the inadequacy of the proposed budget for the next fiscal year, Moseley wrote to Beane.

But the director, Rebecca Boss, “affirmed governor’s commitment to fully fund Consent Decree activities during FY (Fiscal Year) 19 and said that no rate cuts in reimbursements or spending reductions were being proposed,” according to Moseley.

“She noted that the Governor had demonstrated a history of including supplemental funding to the DD (developmental disabilities) services budget when expenditures exceeded enacted amounts and would continue to do so if necessary,”  Moseley wrote.

On separate occasions, both Boss and Beane said assurances about the state’s support of the consent decree could be sought from the governor, Moseley recalled.

For some time, Moseley has said that the Division of Developmental Disabilities needs four fulltime inspectors to conduct onsite reviews of all three dozen private service providers every two years and to ensure their services meet the standards of the consent decree.

He said Kerri Zanchi, director of developmental disabilities, and Kevin Savage, the BHDDH licensing administrator, “argued strongly” during a meeting with Moseley May 2 that two inspectors, or “surveyors” as they will be called, “would be sufficient to meet the need and ensure compliance” along with an data analyst and “other measures.”  Zanchi was to provide a subsequent written analysis of the rationale for the BHDDH approach.

In an earlier report to the monitor, BHDDH officials explained their plan for a centralized, departmental quality assurance unit. In the first year, the two surveyors would be supervised by Anne LeClerc, Associate Director of Program Performance in the Division of Developmental Disabilities, which is also to have the benefit of its own data analyst and a divisional operations manager.

In this initial year, the new “surveyors” will enable the division to rigorously analyze the effectiveness of its existing day services to better plan for future improvements, according to the state’s report to the monitor April 30.

In the second year, however, the surveyors will be assigned to a centralized quality management unit to connect the BHDDH investigatory unit with licensing and certification of private service providers, according to the state’s quarterly report. 

Raimondo's spokeswoman said she supports the BHDDH quality improvement plan. 

To date, there have been no filings in the court record indicating what Moseley will recommend to the judge.

To read Governor Raimondo's letter to the consent decree monitor, click here.

To read the consent decree monitor's letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services click here.

DiPalma: RI Must Invest In Transformation of DD Services To Protect Most Vulnerable

By Louis P. DiPalma

DiPalma headshot

The Rhode Island Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) in the Department of Behavioral Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Hospitals (BHDDH) is undergoing a significant transformation, much like Department of Children, Youth and Families. This transformation requires financial investment to succeed, not the proposed cuts.

As legislators, we must work to ensure we invest in the most vulnerable populations in our state, including the more than 4,000 individuals living with intellectual/ developmental disabilities (I/DD) who are served by BHDDH-DDD.

From a programs perspective, there are at least two critical elements of transformation the agency is undertaking. The first element is required by the 10-year 2014 consent decree settlement with the Department of Justice for violation of the civil rights of individuals with I/DD. The state, currently in its fourth year of transformation, is now under a court order.

The key focus of this transformational initiative is to transition individuals with I/DD from working in sheltered workshops to integrated employment and community-based programming. And, while the state is making progress in many areas, there is still a need for increased focus and attention.

When all is said and done, in 2024, successfully achieving the goals of the Consent Decree will require approximately $25 million in annual state and federal funding. The Department of Justice is closely monitoring our investments and commitment to reforming our practices toward full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in local communities and businesses. We must invest and commit to the ideals of inclusion for individuals with I/DD.

Another critical element of transformation is the transition of individuals with I/DD from living in group homes to alternative living arrangements, such as shared living arrangements. This transformational, voluntary program, when fully implemented, will require less funding than what is currently needed to support the same individuals in group homes.

The state is making progress in ensuring new DD clients who enter the system have the opportunity to live independently with supports, though challenges remain. During this multi-year transition, the agency will be required to sustain and maintain both systems, necessitating additional investment for multiple years, including in additional personnel. Without it, the transition will not be successful, individuals will not be in the most appropriate settings, and the savings would be unrealized.

Gov. Gina Raimondo has committed to new leadership for BHDDH and DDD to lead this transformation, and progress is being made. However, we are at a point in the transformation that requires investment in the division and the services they fund.

A review of the proposed budgets for the BHDDH-DDD, shows a revised current year budget, including general revenue and federal funding, of $269 million and the proposed fiscal year 2019 budget of $248 million, a reduction of $21 million.

A $21 million reduction in funding at a time when investments are needed. As a legislator, I appreciate the challenge the governor is confronting, especially in light of our structural deficit. Any increases in revenues should be invested in Rhode Island’s most vulnerable citizens, including individuals living with I/DD. It is the right thing to do, and it will help continue progress toward system transformation and compliance with the consent decree.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt said it best: “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have little.”

Louis P. DiPalma, a Rhode Island state senator, is a Democrat serving Newport, Middletown, Little Compton, and Tiverton

RI DDD Officials To Discuss Next Steps in Shift Toward "Person-Centered" System

The Rhode Island Division of Developmental Disabilities has reviewed comments from 16 public meetings held since May on its intention to move toward a “person-centered” system, built on the idea that the primary focus of the division’s services should be the needs and preferences of each adult it serves.

DDD officials will summarize the comments they received from the public and discuss the next steps Wednesday, Sept. 28 at Rhode Island College and Monday, Oct. 2 at the Community College of Rhode Island in Warwick. Here are the details: 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27

TIME: 5:00-7:00 pm

PLACE: Rhode Island College, East Campus

             Forman Center Auditorium 030 (parking behind the building) 

             600 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Providence, RI

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2ND

TIME: 1:00 – 3:00 pm

PLACE: Community College of RI, Knight Campus, Room 4080

              400 East Ave, Warwick, RI 

              

 

 

RI DD Workers To Get Average 36-Cent Hourly Pay Bump After Oct. 1; Retroactive Checks To Follow

By Gina Macris

Revised calculations indicate that the estimated hourly wage increase for those providing direct care to adults with development disabilities will be an average of 36 cents an hour, or 6 cents less than the 42 cents an hour that was originally estimated last spring.

 The 36-cent increase will push the average hourly rate, before taxes, to $11.50.

A memo to developmental disability service organizations from the state Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) dated Sept. 21 said the raises will be embedded in increased reimbursement rates to private service providers scheduled to kick in Oct. 1.

The lower figure resulted from unanticipated increases related to the number of hours of service that have been billed to the state for a variety of reasons, according to state Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, first vice-chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and a close follower of developmental disability finances.

DiPalma likened the situation to the number of people getting served from a single pie.  In this case, the pie is the $6 million the General Assembly earmarked for raises. But the number of service hours, or slices of pie, has gone up. That means that the size of the portions, or the average increase, will be smaller. 

The DDD memo spelled out the factors in the calculations: “the numbers of consumers served, the provision of more individualized and costly services, the expansion of employment supports, as well as supplemental authorizations to address the acuity needs of consumers.” 

In a hearing chaired by DiPalma Sept. 21, Rebecca Boss, director of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH), said that a continued trend toward “higher acuity,” or greater individual need, will result in “unanticipated stressors in the budget.” 

Because the General Assembly specified in budget language that the raises were to be effective July 1, the private service agencies and their workers will get retroactivity. Although October paychecks will reflect the raise, retroactive payments covering July-September  “should be made available to DDOs (developmental disability organizations) by the end of October 2017 or early November 2017 for disbursement, “ according to the memo.

The current average hourly rate for direct care workers is about $11.14, according to a trade association, with the actual rate varying from one agency to another, depending on many factors, including benefits and other overhead costs. Employee-related overhead is included in the higher rates the state must pay the private agencies. The employers, in turn, put the raises into employee paychecks. 

RI Employment First Task Force Seeks Data To Compare DD Eligibility Policy and Practice

By Gina Macris

A year ago, Rhode Island adopted a policy allowing students with developmental disabilities at least 12 months before they left high school to plan their entry into the adult world.

Now, the Employment First Task Force wants to know whether the policy and the reality are one and the same.

Word of mouth among special education professionals is that in some cases, the families of students notified they will be eligible for adult services from the state Division of Developmental Disabilities nevertheless aren’t given a budget in enough time to make a good adult service plan before they leave school.

Claire Rosenbaum, the Adult Services Coordinator at the Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College, raised the issue at the most recent meeting of the Employment First Task Force July 18.

The task force chairman, Kevin Nerney, of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities Council, said he would ask state developmental disability officials in writing to come to the group’s next meeting with data showing how closely the state is adhering to its “eligibility by 17” policy.

The state established the policy in July, 2016, in response to a U.S. District Court order which said it must eliminate service gaps for eligible young adults once they leave high school. Judge John J. McConnell, Jr. had been presented with evidence that eligible young adults sat at home doing nothing for weeks or months after they left high school because adult services were not in place.

Young adults are one of four categories of individuals with developmental disabilities who are protected by a 2014 consent decree requiring the state to move away from sheltered workshops and non-work programs akin to day care toward purposeful activities in the community, with an emphasis on jobs paying at least minimum wage. 

The consent decree envisioned the Employment First Task Force as a group representative of adults with developmental disabilities, families, and community organizations that could serve as a bridge between the public and state government.

The eligibility policy says that, unless there is a need for extra documentation, students should be notified within 30 days of filing applications whether they will receive adult services. If they are eligible, they should be scheduled for an assessment of need, called the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS, within 30 days. And 30 days after the assessment, they should be notified of the individual funding allocations they have received, according to the policy.

A spokeswoman for the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) said July 20 that "it will take some time" to gather answers to detailed questions about adherence to the timelines in the "eligibility by 17"  policy and additional questions about the SIS.

Questions raised at Tuesday’s meeting about the eligibility timeline overlapped with queries contained in a task force report to Charles Moseley, an independent monitor appointed by the court to oversee  implementation of the consent decree.

In the report, approved by consensus Tuesday, the task force recommends that Moseley collect detailed information on various aspects of the application and funding process and appeals of decisions made by the state. The task force previously has requested application and eligibility data from the state but has not received it, according to the report.

Other sections of the report covered a number of topics, including “person-centered planning,” an individualized approach to arranging services that incorporates a range of personal choices that go far beyond menus of activities that may offered by one provider or another.

Moseley has made it clear he believes person-centered planning is the foundation for compliance with the consent decree,

Nerney, the task force chairman, said in the group's report that he believes such truly individualized planning “could have a greater positive effect on people’s lives than the consent decree itself. “

At the same time, “you can’t destabilize the current provider system while building a new one,” Nerney warned.

Rosenbaum said that truly individualized, or “person-centered” planning, a comprehensive process requiring a skilled facilitator, can’t be done properly with the amount of money available in the state’s developmental disability system.

The next meeting of the Employment First Task Force, open to the public, has been set for Aug. 8 at 2 p.m. at the Community Provider Network of RI, 110 Jefferson Blvd., Warwick. It will adjourn at 3 p.m. to avoid any conflict with the quarterly public forum sponsored by the state Division of Developmental Disabilities. That forum runs from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Coventry Department of Human Services and Senior Center, 50 Wood St., Coventry.

RI DD Director Invites Families to Help Overhaul Design of Services With Individual Needs in Mind

Photos by Anne Peters

Photos by Anne Peters

Kerri Zanchi, center, Director of the RI Division of Developmental Disabilities, is flanked by administrators Heather Mincey, left, and Anne LeClerc, right, as she addresses the audience at a public forum in Newport May 2. 

By Gina Macris

Beginning May 10, Rhode Island’s Division of Developmental Disabilities plans to involve the adults it serves, their families, service providers and advocates in a step-by-step process to overhaul the way it does business .

Kerri Zanchi, the new director of the division, told Aquidneck Island residents who attended a public forum May 2 at the Community College of Rhode Island that the initial discussions will inform an effort to re-write the regulations governing developmental disability services to put the needs and wants of its clients front and center. 

The changes have two drivers:

  • A 2014 consent decree requiring the state to correct violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act by providing employment supports and access to non-work supports in the community.
  • A compliance deadline of March, 2019 for implementation of a Medicaid rule on Home and Community Based Services (HCBS), which requires an individualized approach to care, treating individuals with disabilities as full-fledged members of their communities.  

Both the consent decree and the HCBS rule draw their authority from the 1999 Olmstead decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, which amounted to a desegregation order affecting all services for all individuals with disabilities.

 Zanchi used the term “person-centered” to sum up the kind of planning and practices that go into the new inclusive approach.  A. Anthony Antosh, director of the Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College, elaborated.

A. Anthony Antosh

A. Anthony Antosh

“The way the system has worked forever is that someone else controls what people get. We want people with disabilities to get more control of their own lives,” he said. “Resources support part of their lives but not all of their lives,” he said.

He said that in several states, including Texas, Kentucky and North Carolina, faith-based support networks in various communities have resulted in a “dramatically broader network” of personal relationships for individuals with disabilities. “And 80 percent of them have jobs,” Antosh said.

To flesh out the concepts of individualization and integration and how they might work in Rhode Island,  Antosh and Zanchi will co-host a series of discussions to explore the idea and solicit comments throughout the month of May.

The first two sessions will be held in the morning and evening of Wednesday, May 10 at the Sherlock Center. (Details at end of article.)

 “It’s a lot of change. It’s a pivotal time,” Zanchi said. But “if you don’t have a strong person-centered practice, it’s really hard to move the system forward and comply with the consent decree and HCBS.”

Zanchi said she and her staff will pull together comments from all the public sessions and present the results to the public in the early summer, setting the stage for regulatory reform.

Howard Cohen

Howard Cohen

Howard Cohen, whose adult son has developmental disabilities, took a dim view of the current regulations.  While the goal was to “even up the playing field among the agencies” by establishing uniform rates of reimbursement, he said, the regulations resulted in “a lot of resources toward book keeping rather than managing care.” 

And “the last time, the regulations got ramrodded through,” Cohen said, an allusion to the regulatory changes adopted by the General Assembly in 2011 as part of “Project Sustainability.”

Kevin Savage, director of licensing for developmental disability services, said all those with a stake in the regulations – including families – will be invited to participate in writing new ones.

The new regulations will not be aimed at “correcting past mistakes” but will try to conform to the law reflected in the consent decree and in HCBS, he said. The process also is expected to result in 20 percent fewer regulations than there are now, Savage said.

Zanchi emphasized that compliance with HCBS will mean a change in case management, or the formal approval process for allocating resources to each person’s program of services.

Currently social workers, who have an average caseload of 205 clients per person, share the case management responsibilities with provider agencies, she said. But HCBS sees an inherent conflict of interest in providers making decisions about the services they themselves furnish, to the possible detriment of the individualized goals of the client.

Zanchi said some states use third-party case management and others have state employees do the job, with a “firewall” between them and the fiscal arm of state government.  In Rhode Island, changes in case management won’t come until 2018, she said.

She also told family members that the state would explore expanding the options for residential care, an issue of particular concern to older parents in light of a virtual freeze on group home admissions. HCBS expects states will move away from group home residential care.

After the meeting, Zanchi was asked how changes in practice brought about by the new regulations would be funded.

“When we figure out what it (the service system) would look like, then we need to figure out the funding for it,” she said.

During the forum, Dottie Darcy, the mother of an adult with developmental disabilities, wondered aloud how officials would “develop a system, without money, to account for the needs of all the people. At some point funding has to be addressed,” she said.

“I think it’s outrageous” that service providers “can’t keep workers” because they can’t pay enough, Darcy said.

She lamented a lack of organized advocacy with members of the General Assembly on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities.

Claire Rosenbaum, a member of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities Council, said it is in the process of trying to revive its family organization to do exactly the kind of work Darcy described, “but it’s not there yet.”

The first two sessions on “Person-Centered Thinking and Planning” will be Wednesday, May 10, from 10 a.m. to noon and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Sherlock Center on Disabilities on the campus of Rhode Island College, 600 Mount Pleasant Ave., Providence. These meetings will be of particular interest to families who direct their own programs of services for family members, but all sessions in the series are open to the public.

Those wishing to attend should RSVP with Claire Rosenbaum by May 8 at 401-456-4732 or crosenbaum@ric.edu

Budget Testimony: Need For DD Raises Critical, Stable Services Demand Double Current Funding

tom Kane                         RI capitol tv Image

tom Kane                         RI capitol tv Image

By Gina Macris 

This article has been updated. 

As others had done before him, Tom Kane told members of the House Finance Committee that he “could not stress enough” the importance of the General Assembly approving an additional $6.1 million to lift the poverty-level pay of some 4,000 front-line employees of private agencies under contract with the state to care for adults with developmental disabilities.  

At the same time, Kane, CEO of AccessPoint RI, one of those private agencies, said in a hearing April 11 that the overall funding for developmental disabilities is only about 50 percent of what is needed for service providers to regain the financial stability they once had and help their clients receive the supports they need and deserve. 

All together Governor Gina Raimondo seeks General Assembly approval for raising the currently enacted developmental disability budget of $246.2 million by $10.5 million over the next 14 months, with $4.4 million of the increase applied before June 30. Another $6.1 million would be added for the fiscal year beginning July 1, for a total of $256.7 in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018.

Kane explained to members of the Finance Committee’s Human Services Subcommittee, led by Rep. Teresa A. Tanzi, D-South Kingstown and Narragansett), the different kinds of pitfalls he saw in Raimondo’s attempts to offset the cost of the raises by cutting expenses in other areas – or not covering some necessary spending at all.  

For example, Kane said, AccessPoint had a $107,000 increase in health insurance rates this year. ”There is no money” to cover that cost, he said. “We spend almost $1.2 million in health insurance for 158 people,” he said.  Kane said he could not expect his employees, many of whom make less than $11 an hour, to contribute more to health insurance, so other adjustments were made. He did not elaborate. 

“But at some point there’s going to be a collision between all these additional costs” and direct care workers, Kane said. In written remarks, he said the “cost of other insurances, building maintenance, rent, vehicles, fuel and office supplies continue to increase, adding to the financial strain on organizations. These costs should not be seen as extraneous. They directly relate to our ability to focus our full attention on good quality service provision,” Kane said.

He also zeroed in on some line-item savings that Raimondo has budgeted to offset the cost of the second consecutive raise for direct care workers, particularly the plan to reduce group home costs by $2.1 million in state funds. That ongoing effort, driven by economic and policy considerations, aims to move group home residents to less costly shared living arrangements in private homes - a process that requires clients to actively agree to the change. 

During the transition, there must be a consideration for maintaining the living arrangements of the individuals left behind in the group homes, Kane said, recalling a case in which two of four people in one AccessPoint home opted for shared living. Because the agency could not afford to keep the house operating with only two residents, it sought supplemental funds from the Division of Developmental Disabilities for a few months to cover outstanding expenses while it figured out its long-range plan, Kane said. The home finally closed, he said.

The example illustrates how, during a transition, “you are balancing two systems at the same time, “ Kane said.

“If you don’t pay attention to the current system with the same amount of zeal as the new system, people will get lost,” he said.

In fact, the state so far has been unable to realize much savings from the emphasis on shared living, only $100,000 of a target of $2.6 million in state funds in the current fiscal year, according to officials of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH).

Since last July, a total of 48 group home residents have committed to shared living. That figure is 18 shy of a target of 66 individuals for the fiscal year ending June 30.

Kerri Zanchi, Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, said that of the 48, 28 have moved since December, when the division began addressing issues that were barriers to shared living arrangements, like a need for physical modifications to some houses to make them more easily accessible, as well as extra medical and behavioral supports needed in the host homes. She said the division is also considering a range of other alternatives to group home living.

Ultimately, Kane said, a budget is a “representation of the values of our state.”  The care for people with disabilities and the salaries paid to caregivers either will reflect the dignity and respect afforded valuable members of society, or they won’t, Kane said.

 “I understand you have a lot of very difficult decisions to make,” he told the legislators, “and the numbers (revenues) aren’t looking great this year, which are going to make all those decisions even tougher.”

But Kane asked them to look at historical spending for developmental disability services, which he said are now only $9 million more than they were in 2010. In the meantime the demands of a 2014 federal consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as new Medicaid rules for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS), make the job of supporting individuals with disabilities much more complex and expensive, he said. 

Traditionally, he said, support has been provided in “congregate” settings, or facilities “where you have groups of ten people with one staff person. “

“Under the consent decree they have to be either at a job or in the community,” he said. Those settings demand ratios of one staffer for each client, or no more than three clients, depending on the circumstances, Kane said.  In addition, the consent decree requires job coaches to be trained to a specific certification. and trained workers will demand higher pay, Kane said.t

The latest statistics indicate the current average pay for direct care workers is $11.14 an hour, before taxes, a figure that reflects a raise of about 32 cents effective last July 1, according to Donna Martin, executive director of the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island (CPNRI), a trade association which represents 25 of some three dozen private providers of developmental disability services.

The hourly reimbursement rate the state pays the employers for direct care workers is $11.91, which includes both wages and most – but not all – of employers’ actual costs for overhead and fringe benefits. That figure is still lower than the hourly reimbursement rate of $12.03 the General Assembly authorized in July, 2011  at the same time it cut a total of $24 million for private provider services, according to a chart prepared by James Parisi of the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals.

In October, 2011, three months after the General Assembly acted, BHDDH reduced the actual reimbursement rate to $10.66 an hour, according to Parisi’s calculations.  Since then, the rate has been climbing incrementally to its current level of $11.91.

Parisi represents workers at the Trudeau Center in Warwick, where the starting salary is now $10.71 an hour.

Tori Flis, a service coordinator at one agency, which she did not name, said that even though there has been a slight increase in wages in the last year, the turnover is “just as high.”

Martin, of CPNRI, put the average turnover at one out of three workers a year, or 33 percent, although it varies from one agency to another.  Employers are unable to fill one out of six vacancies, and it costs an agency an average of $4900 every time it must search for a replacement and train a new hire, Martin said.  

Markella Carnavalle, who works at Trudeau, described the impact that turnover can have on individuals with developmental disabilities.

One client, who had grown attached to a worker who had to leave, was “crying for weeks,” she said.

That person had behavioral issues and didn’t want to work or eat, Carnavalle said. The client believed the worker left because “they didn’t want to be with me,” Carnavalle said, but “you can’t say the person needed more money. They don’t look at it that way.”

“You become a part of their lives and they become a part of yours” over time, Carnavalle said.

Flis, meanwhile, said the workers she supervises all have two and three jobs to make ends meet. Some work as many as three consecutive 12-hour shifts at different agencies – a total of 48 hours straight.

Those kinds of conditions lead to burnout, abuse and neglect, Flis said. The only reason she can afford to work one job at Trudeau is that she is married to a teacher who has a good salary and fringe benefits, including a pension, Flis said.

In another part of the current budget,  BHDDH officials and the legislators disagreed on whether there is funding for a developmental disabilities ombudsman, a position approved by the General Assembly last year after a woman died in a state-run group home. The state-run residential system is separate from the private system. 

The legislators and a member of the House fiscal advisory staff, Linda Haley,  said a total of $170,000 had been included in the BHDDH budget for the position.

Representing BHDDH, Christopher Feisthamel, the chief financial officer, and Zanchi, the developmental disabilities director, both said they understood it was an “unfunded mandate.”  Haley and BHDDH officials spoke informally after the hearing but reached no agreement on the status of the position.

(This article has been updated to correct the total cost of health insurance for AccessPoint RI, which is $1.2 million, not $12 million, according to CEO Tom Kane.)