Collaboration Needed to Find Jobs, Solve Transportation Problems, For People With DD

By Gina Macris

For people with developmental disabilities, reliable public transportation – or the lack of it – can mean the difference between accepting a job offer and staying home.

A Coventry, RI man who had a chance to work at a Home Depot near his home faced that dilemma when he learned that the state’s paratransit system for people with disabilities could not go into the shopping center where the store is located.

To solve the transportation problem, the man’s family and his job developer, Rory Carmody, Director of Program Services at AccessPoint RI, pitch in to drive him to and from work, said Carmody’s boss, Tom Kane. But the hours the man can work are limited to the times Carmody and the man’s family are available for drop-off and pick-up, said Kane.

Kane, the CEO of AccessPoint, shared the story in a conversation after a June 18 meeting of a special legislative commission studying Project Sustainability, the state’s fee-for-service reimbursement system for private services for adults with developmental disabilities.

L to R: Scott Jensen and Scott Avedesian

L to R: Scott Jensen and Scott Avedesian

The session focused on the intersection of jobs and transportation, featuring remarks from three speakers:

· Scott Avedesian, CEO of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA)

· Scott Jensen, Director of the Department of Labor and Training (DLT)

· Robert Kalaskowski, Chief of Policy and Planning for the Governor’s Workforce Board.

The example of the Coventry man illustrates the challenges of relying on the paratransit program, which operates only along corridors that mimic RIPTA’s regular bus routes. The shared RIde program for people with disabilities may drop off and pick up at sites no more than three-quarters of a mile outside a regular bus route, according to the RIPTA website.

Because RIPTA doesn’t send regular buses to Little Compton or Foster, the RIde option for residents with disabilities is not available either, said Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown. And, he added, there’s only one public transit stop in Tiverton.

Recently, the directors of the agencies responsible for services for the elderly and those with intellectual and developmental disabilities accompanied Avedesian on a paratransit run that picked up four individuals, one of them in a wheelchair, and took them to their various destinations.

Rebecca Boss, the director of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH), said it was a “really good experience for everyone to see the hands-on, labor-intensive type of transit that we perform.”

For the officials, the experience took two and a half hours, from the time the van left the RIPTA garage to get the first client until the time it returned, Avedesian and Boss agreed. It happened to be a day with a lot of traffic, Avedesian added.

Even though the clients weren’t on the van all that time, Kate Sherlock, a commission member, said the run took too long. “I cry when I have to be in the car for two hours,” she said.

Avedesian said that for him, the biggest takeaway from the experience was the need for matching the locations of clients and available jobs to minimize travel time, “so that we’re not taking someone all the way from Woonsocket to Newport.”

Avedesian said he’s impressed by the “intensive amount of time, money and labor involved in moving one person from one end of the state to the other.”

DiPalma said the average cost of a paratransit run is $34, but the program is reimbursed roughly $8 to $14 of that cost, depending on the intensity of the client’s disability. He said the reimbursements are Medicaid-authorized federal and state transportation dollars assigned to BHDDH clients to cover travel. No public transit system in the country is financially self-sufficient, DiPalma noted.

DiPalma has convened an informal group of representatives of public and private agencies who are interested in solving the transportation problems of people with disabilities. The agencies include BHDDH , DLT, RIPTA, the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island, the Providence Chamber of Commerce, the office of U.S. Rep. James Langevin, and others, he said.

Moving forward, transportation must become more malleable to the needs of the people, he said. If someone lives in Glocester and has a job in Newport, that person may be able to get work closer to home, but “if that’s the job they have, that’s the job they have,” DiPalma said.

Jensen

Jensen

Jensen of DLT offered a different way of looking at the transportation problem.

If people with developmental disabilities can be viewed as a source of excellent workers, rather than a population needing support, a stronger argument can be made for investing more in transportation, because of the value this group brings to the economy, he said.

“The company will be receiving value, the person will be paying income tax and can buy more things than they otherwise would,” Jensen said.

He said “coalitions of the willing” are “trying to find those positions where companies recognize the value of people with developmental disabilities. That takes time.”

He said a “handful” of companies, like Home Depot and CVS, have made the “moral choice” to employ individuals with developmental disabilities.

“We want to also help make this a practical choice” for many businesses, Jensen said, by starting with employers’ demands and finding the right match in the labor force - “the right person, in the right place, at the right time, and with the right skill set.”

BHDDH officials recently put the employment rate for adults with developmental disabilities at 29 percent.

Kalaskowski

Kalaskowski

Kalaskowski, of the Governor’s Workforce Board, said the state is promoting that strategy in the Real Pathways program, part of the broader Real Jobs initiative.

In Real Pathways, DLT works with private providers of employment-related services for adults with developmental disabilities, promoting collaboration among job developers to find the best match between the employer’s demand and worker skills.

A job developer working alone may not have just the right client and face the choice of either forcing a match that won’t work out in the long run or letting a relationship with an employer die, Kalaskowski said. In a network of job developers, one may pass along a lead to another and they will return the favor down the line, he said.

Andrew McQuaide, a senior director with Perspectives Corporation, said Jensen and his team deserve “a lot of credit” for fostering a culture of collaboration.

McQuaide recalled how one man with developmental disabilities connected with a training opportunity offered by the Rhode Island Nursery and Landscape Association because both he and AccessPoint’s Rory Carmody “spread the word.”

Then, when a job with a landscaping company opened up, someone in the community who knew the man from the RINLA training recommended him for the position. The man got the job “not because DLT put any dollars forward,” McQuaide said, but because of the “culture and the connections” that DLT promoted.

Boss, the BHDDH director, said she is excited about the collaboration with DLT. Tracey Cunningham, the director of employment services, and other dedicated officials at BHDDH do a good job in helping adults with developmental disabilities find work, but the staff at DLT “lives, eats and breathes” jobs, she said.

The next meeting of the Project Sustainability commission, set for June 25, has been cancelled because of likely schedule conflicts as the General Assembly wraps up its 2019 session, DiPalma said. He said the meeting will be re-scheduled sometime in July.

RI DD Rate Reviewers Asked To Fix Payment System That Still Promotes Segregated Care

By Gina Macris

This article was updated June 17 with a response from the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals.

The Rhode Island state agency which funds services for adults with developmental disabilities has acknowledged for the first time that its underlying reimbursement system for private providers is structurally deficient for complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act as required by a 2014 federal civil rights decree.

While the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) has pursued services promoting greater independence for adults with developmental disabilities, “the underlying reimbursement system has lagged,” according to a statement of the scope of work outlined for a consortium tasked with reviewing reimbursement rates.

The rate structure “is grounded in past practices and cost bases associated with the provision of services in the sheltered workshop setting,” BHDDH officials wrote.

“In order to adequately meet consumers’ needs, providers have been paid supplemental funds to address the deficiency in the payment rates,” BHDDH explained in the contract.

BHDDH has a contract with the New England States Consortium Systems Organization (NESCSO) to update a rate structure that has not been reviewed for eight years and to suggest alternates to the current payment methods.

In describing the work ahead for NESCSO, BHDDH says it is:

“seeking to further promote the development of a service system and associated reimbursement arrangements that maximize the opportunity for persons with DD to participate to the fullest possible in community-based activities.”

In 2014 the U.S. Department of Justice found that the reimbursement system incentivized segregated care in sheltered workshops and day centers in violation of the Integration Mandate of the ADA, reinforced by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Olmstead decision.

The Obama administration began vigorously enforcing the Olmstead decision in 2009, but the consent decree in Rhode Island was the first settlement that addressed segregation in daytime services rather than housing.

The consent decree provides a decade-long period of federal oversight of the state’s efforts to change the system. Enforcement of the consent decree entered its sixth year April 9. It will take at least another year for changes in rates and payment methods to go into effect, with the approval of the General Assembly. Enforcement of the decree is set to expire in 2024, but the state would have to show substantial compliance before federal oversight ends.

While some improvements in services have been made, the contract with NESCSO indicates that BHDDH officials believe the reimbursement system has held back compliance efforts.

Staffing Ratios Hinder Needed Flexibility

The underlying problem, said the BHDDH director in an interview, is a rule that requires a ratio of 60 percent funding for community-based activities and 40 percent funding for center-based daytime care in each client’s individual authorization.

The contract language alludes to this situation in describing staffing ratios. It says two areas of “particular focus” are daytime rates paid for employment-related and non-work services. In sheltered settings, for example, there might be one worker for every ten clients. But in the community the number of clients for each worker would have to be much smaller.

Rebecca Boss, the BHDDH director, said the department seeks a “predictable rate structure not driven by very precise ratios” but rather by the needs and preferences of individual clients.

The supplemental payments intended to mitigate the deficiencies in the underlying system “are an increasing portion of overall payments, reflecting the inadequacy of the current rates,” the contract language explained.

According to department officials, that language was meant to refer to the historical trend, in which supplemental payments had increased to as much as $7.8 million in a three-month period.

Boss froze new approvals at the end of 2017, except for emergency health and safety considerations and a couple other narrowly defined exceptions, to try to curb a multi-million dollar deficit at a time when Governor Gina Raimondo seemed inclined to cut developmental disability services significantly.

According to records BHDDH turns in to the General Assembly every month, the supplemental payments from January through March of this year have declined to $3.6 million, about half the total for the same period in 2018.

Historically, supplemental payments have been awarded only when consumers, families, or providers have made successful appeals of individual authorizations. The appeals, which often have required considerable time and energy, must be made annually, or the authorization reverts to the original amount. The appeals process is but one facet of what many families and providers describe as an unstable system.

Kerri Zanchi, director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, said supplemental payments are still a big part of reimbursements to private providers, and BHDDH wants NESCSO and its consultants to scrutinize them as part of the review process.

Study Commission To Hear from NESCSO

The rate review coincides with the work of a special legislative commission studying the current reimbursement system, called Project Sustainability.

On June 18, the commission will meet to hear presentations about employment and transportation issues from Scott Jensen, director of the Department of Labor and Training; and from Scott Avedesian, CEO of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority.

On June 25, the executive director of NESCSO, Elena Nicolella, is scheduled to appear before the commission to give an update on the rate review now being conducted by four consultants under NESCSO’s supervision.

In the meantime, some commission members have given BHDDH their own statements on how they think consultants should approach the work and their ideas for a new system of services that allow consumers and their families to shape the way state funds are used.

A spokeswoman for providers has urged NESCSO and its consultants to gain a thorough understanding of what it costs for a private agency to provide services under the terms of recently-revised regulations for provider operations and quality certification standards.

These bureaucratic steps are part of the state’s efforts to comply with the consent decree and the federal Medicaid Home And Community Based Final Rule (HCBS). Like the consent decree, HCBS embraces the integration mandate of the ADA, but it is a nationwide rule applying to all community-based services funded by Medicaid.

Paradox In Unspent Funds For Employment

Tina Spears, executive director of the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island, warned that simply looking at the way providers utilize the current reimbursement model, which is based on segregated care, will not give the complete picture of the needs of the system.

She did not mention specifics, but a case in point is the performance-based supported employment program, which was funded by a $6.8 million allocation made by the General Assembly in the fiscal year that began July 1, 2016. That allocation still has not been completely spent.

Excluding a start-up period from January through June of 2017, the program spent $2.5 million the first year, from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. It’s expected to spend $4 million in the fiscal year ending June 30, according to a BHDDH spokesman.

Providers initially complained that they could not meet their costs with the series of one-time incentives offered by the program, which was built on same reimbursement system designed for center-based care.

Incentives and enhancements were made more generous during the second year, and negotiations are underway for a third year of the program.

In the meantime, Rhode Island’s last sheltered workshop closed last year and BHDDH says community-based, competitive employment has increased to about 29 percent of adults with developmental disabilities.

A study released by two nationwide associations of providers in January said Rhode Island’s rate of competitive employment was about 19 percent, but that figure dated from 2015. The “Case for Inclusion” ranked Rhode Island 32nd in the nation on its integration efforts. It was compiled by ANCOR - the American Network of Community Options and Resources, and UCP – United Cerebral Palsy.

Consumers Want More Control Over Money Assigned To Them

Kevin Nerney, executive director of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities Council, and Kelly Donovan, who receives state-funded supports, each called for a system that allows greater consumer control of state funding and greater flexibility in the way it is used.

The state should “ensure that funding is available across all imaginable living arrangements,” particularly in situations where a consumer owns or rents a property and a caregiver or family would like to move in. The caregiver or consumer should be allowed a stipend, as is permitted in many other states, to make this type of arrangement viable, Nerney said.

The state should also ensure that adults with developmental disabilities have the support of familiar staff while they are hospitalized to avoid the trauma of being in an unfamiliar environment where they can neither make themselves understood nor understand what is being said to them, Nerney said.

In addition, the state should adopt a way to assess the support a person receives from family or friends in deciding funding levels. While most of those receiving services from the Division of Developmental Disabilities live in the family home, that home may include a large healthy family, a single aging parent, or a grandparent with Alzheimer’s and a sibling who also has significant needs for support, Nerney said.

And he called for more funding for those hired by self-directed consumers and their families to write support plans necessary to qualify for state funding. The expectations for the plan writers have multiplied over the last 20 years but the fees remains the same at $500 for the initial plan and $350 for an annual renewal, Nerney said. There should be an allowance for self-directed families who need ongoing coordination of services, he said.

Kelly Donovan, who herself receives services from BHDDH gave a concrete example of what greater control and flexibility might look like.

She said people should be able to enjoy an outing without:

A: going home early because a staffer’s shift ends

B: taking everyone in your group home with you, even if one or more of them really didn’t want to come.

“People should be able to have their designated time to themselves and opportunities to be involved in community activities,” she said.

The public may submit comments or questions about the rate review process by email at BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov. Please copy and paste the email address into your email program, or get a link by visiting http://www.bhddh.ri.gov/developmentaldisabilities/community_forums_event.php

In response to this article, Randal Edgar, a spokesman for BHDDH, released the following statement on June 17:

The article published on June 12 on the Olmstead Updates blog presents a misleading picture of Rhode Island’s system of care for adults with developmental disabilities.

The headline claims this system “promotes segregated care.”

This assertion is false.

The article attempts to back up this assertion up by referring to language in a state contract with a consultant that is reviewing the rates paid to DD providers. But in referencing the contract language, the article misreads the intent of that language.

The contract language speaks from a historical perspective. It states that while the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals has pursued the development of “a services system that supports greater independence” for the DD population, “the underlying reimbursement system has lagged.” It goes on to say that the “basis for the development of prevailing rates is grounded in past practices and cost bases associated with the provision of services in the sheltered workshop setting.”

Acknowledging that the existing rates are grounded in past practices and need to be updated is not the same as saying the system as it operates today promotes segregated care, and in saying it does, the article ignores and/or minimizes many steps the department has taken to improve the care provided to adults with developmental disabilities. It should be noted that the reporter met with BHDDH officials for more than an hour but did not press this assertion and obtain their view of the contract language.

The article is wrong again when it states that department froze new approvals for supplemental payments in 2017 to help offset a budget deficit. The department reduced those approvals, applying more stringent standards, not because of a possible budget deficit but because this made sense from a policy standpoint.

Finally, the article gives voice to people outside the department, asking them to describe where the DD care system should go, without giving BHDDH officials a chance to share their vision. In the process, it conveys a false impression that BHDDH officials are not passionate about moving this system forward.

We are disappointed that the article did not present a more complete and accurate picture.

Separately, the public may submit comments or questions about the rate review process by email at BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov. Please copy and paste the email address into your email program, or get a link by visiting http://www.bhddh.ri.gov/developmentaldisabilities/community_forums_event.php

"Project Sustainability” Commission To Continue Hearing Members’ Recommendations May 22

By Gina Macris

Members of a special legislative commission studying Rhode Island’s funding of services for adults with developmental disabilities are expected to finish presenting their recommendations for change at the commission’s next meeting Wednesday, May 22, according to the chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma.

The recommendations which have been aired coalesce around a vision of a future in which adults with developmental disabilities get the supports they need to live where they want, find a job, and do what they want in their spare time, just like anyone else, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act. That mandate is reflected both in the Medicaid Home and Community Based Rule (HCBS) and the 2014 federal consent decree between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice.

To realize an inclusive future, it is critical that the state adopt an alternative to the current fee-for-service funding model, which poses “challenges and barriers” for the for the privately-run system of developmental disability services, DiPalma said.

The state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) has begun a review of the rates and the rate model for paying private providers and invites public comment by email at this address: BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov (Please copy and paste the email address.)

DiPalma said commission members have submitted comments on the rate review to BHDDH. In addition, the recommendations aired so far have sounded some common themes, including a need for better transportation and a desire for a seamless bureaucracy that can meet the needs of individuals at all stages of life, DiPalma said.

The transition between special education services in high school and the adult service system has been compared to “falling off a cliff” by many parents, according to anecdotal reports to the commission.

DiPalma said he will ask RIPTA, the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority, and the Department of Labor and Training to become directly involved in efforts to redesign the developmental disabilities service system. The consent decree, which resulted in the elimination of sheltered workshops in Rhode Island, calls on the state to increase supports to adults with developmental disabilities seeking jobs in the community.

The May 22 commission meeting will begin at 2 p.m. in the Senate Lounge at the State House.

RI Budget Goes Into Limbo Over Car Tax Contingency Amendment Inserted By Senate

By Gina Macris

The $9.2 million Rhode Island budget, which appeared poised for final passage by the Senate on June 30, now hangs in limbo on the first day of the new fiscal year, July 1, a casualty of a dispute between the Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate over the Speaker’s signature car tax relief plan.

The situation means that by law, the levels of spending approved by the General Assembly a year ago remain in effect until the General Assembly resolves the Fiscal Year 2018 budget – and no one knows when that might be.

For Rhode Islanders who are elderly or have disabilities, the one exception to the spending freeze is separate legislation, on its way to the governor, which restores their free bus passes on the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority, a $5 million item.

But increases to direct care workers in both developmental disabilities and home health care fields remain up in the air. So do millions of dollars in reimbursements to private developmental disability service agencies, some of them for expenses already incurred in the fiscal year that ended June 30.

The dispute between House Speaker Nicholas A. Mattiello and Senate President Dominick Ruggerio, centers on a Senate amendment which would freeze the level of Mattiello’s car tax relief if, at any time during the six-year phase-out, the state has to dip into its rainy day fund.

During the floor discussion, senators said the state needed a safety net in the event the state cannot ultimately afford the overall $221 million cost of the phase-out, especially in light of uncertainty in Washington over billions of dollars in proposed cuts to Medicaid nationwide. Those drastic reductions would deal Rhode Island a severe blow in many human service programs, including those supporting adults and children with developmental disabilities.

The Senate passed the amendment, with the rest of the budget that had been approved by the House, with just hours remaining in the old fiscal year.

But by that time, Mattiello had adjourned the House and sent the members home. He gave no indication when he might call the House back into session.

In a statement, he said “Despite the House, the Senate and the Governor reaching agreement on a responsible and balanced state budget, I learned today that the Senate was likely to amend the budget on this, the last legislative day. This would have resulted in a long and unproductive night for the members and the public.  I urge the Senate to honor the original agreement and pass the state budget.”

 

RI House Finance Votes For DD Worker Raises, Free Bus Passes, Supplemental DD Services

By Gina Macris

Despite tense negotiations around a $134-million projected revenue shortfall in Rhode Island for the next fiscal year, the House Finance Committee has approved an $11-million increase in federal and state funds to provide raises for direct care workers supporting adults with developmental disabilities and home health care aides in the next fiscal year.

Early the morning of June 16, The House Finance Committee sent an overall $9.2-billion spending package to the full House, which is expected to vote Thursday, June 22.

The Finance Committee’s revised budget also includes $3.4 million a year for two years to restore free bus passes for the elderly and disabled. Since Feb. 1, low-income elderly and disabled riders on the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA) have had to pay 50 cents each trip, and 25 cents for each transfer. During the next two years, the executive branch of government is to figure out a permanent solution to ensure that vulnerable Rhode Islanders have access to public transportation.

According to a House spokeswoman, the proposed budget adopts Governor Gina Raimondo’s request for raises for home health and direct care workers who support some of the state’s most vulnerable citizens, shouldering great responsibilities for poverty-level pay.

The Governor’s budget plan included $6.2 million — $3 million in state revenue and $3.2 million in federal Medicaid funds — for raises of about 5 percent for direct care employees of private agencies that provide most of the supports for adults with developmental disabilities.  Another $4.4 million –$2.2 million from state revenue and the rest from Medicaid – will raise the pay of home health care aides by 7 percent.

Assuming that the raises pass the House and Senate, some 4,000 developmental disability workers will see increases in their paychecks of about 55 cents an hour, before taxes, sometime before Oct. 1. They now make an average of $11.14 an hour, according to a trade association representing about two thirds of some three dozen agencies operating in Rhode Island.

The latest incremental boost in pay would mark the second consecutive year that home health aides and developmental disability workers would have received wage increases, although there appears to be a growing opinion in both the House and Senate that direct care workers remain woefully underpaid for the job they do.

Last fall, State Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, launched a call for this year’s raises as the initial phase of a “15 in 5” campaign that would elevate direct care workers’ pay to at least $15 an hour in five years; by July 1, 2021. A resolution to that effect has passed the Senate Finance Committee, of which DiPalma is vice chairman.

Members of the House have proposed various bills or resolutions to reach that $15 mark sooner, or to ask the Executive Office of Health and Human Services to raise direct care workers’ pay by 28.5 percent to achieve parity with Connecticut and Massachusetts rates by October of this year. Those measures appear to have died in committee.

In hearings in both the House and Senate during the current session, however, legislators have heard testimony that Rhode Island has a tough time competing with Connecticut and Massachusetts for direct care workers, because those states are such an easy commute for many Rhode Islanders.

The House Commission on Vulnerable Populations has included a recommendation that the state strive for direct care wages that are competitive with neighboring states in its final report on its deliberations for the last several months.

During a recent meeting on a draft report, Commission chairman Jeremiah O’Grady, D-Lincoln, the Deputy Majority Leader, said it is clear that salaries for direct care workers have a relationship to quality of care and employee turnover.

“What we see are the most qualified employees going to other states,” he said, and “we hear about very high turnover rates – something like 60 percent – within the first six months” in Rhode Island.

Another factor that will undoubtedly have a bearing on future discussions of direct care pay is that the House Finance Committee agreed to phase in a 90-cent increase in the minimum wage, now $9.60 an hour. That rate would increase 50 cents, to $10.10 an hour, Jan. 1, 2018, and another 40 cents, to $10.50 an hour, on Jan. 1, 2019. That means that the pay of direct care workers will continue to hover around minimum wage or a little higher.

Meanwhile, Massachusetts has committed to raising its rates for direct care workers to $15 in 2018.

Complete figures on the developmental disability budget were not immediately available.But on June 19, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) said that Governor Raimondo got all she asked for in developmental disability spending from the House Finance Committee except for $200,000 in supplements to the current fiscal year and an equal amount in the fiscal year beginning July 1.

Last July 1, the state Division of Developmental Disabilities started the current fiscal year with an enacted budget of more than $246 million. Raimondo’s total request for fiscal 2018, beginning July 1, was $256.7 million.

Apart from the raises for direct care workers, the Division of Developmental Disabilities has sought funds to cover an estimated deficit of $3.6 million in the existing budget because of supplemental payments needed to respond to successful appeals of funding allocated for individual client services.  Those payments – not reflected in a separate line item – were nevertheless budgeted at $18 million in the fiscal year ending June 30, according to fiscal analyses done by both the House and Senate.

In the fiscal year beginning July 1, Raimondo asked for an additional $500,000 for supplemental service allocations. That increase would bring the total for such payments to just over $22 million annually. In a Senate Finance Committee hearing earlier this year, DiPalma, the committee’s vice chairman, noted that these extra payments totaled about 10 percent of all reimbursements to private agencies providing developmental disability services. That was too much, he said, indicating that equation the state uses to assign individual funding in the first place needs review.

The compromise budget passed by the House Finance Committee absorbed the $134-million projected revenue shortfall in the next fiscal year through a number of approaches: using one-time revenue, scaling back the Governor’s economic development initiatives, and making a myriad of cuts throughout state government, among others. 

 The Raimondo administration also is expected to make $25 million in unspecified cuts. The $25-million spending reduction and other provisions based on certain assumptions for the future make the budget a tricky one to balance, said DiPalma, a leading advocate for those with developmental disabilities and others receiving Medicaid-funded services.

For example, he said, in the BHDDH budget, there is an expectation that the Eleanor Slater Hospital will be able to shift $1.6 million in operating costs from state revenue to third-party payers during the current fiscal year and an equal amount in the fiscal year beginning July 1. He indicated that achieving all the designated savings in state revenue in the current fiscal year might be a challenge when only ten days remain in the budget cycle.

The BHDDH budget also contains a variety of cuts to capital projects, although a department spokeswoman said funds for improvements to the Eleanor Slater Hospital were transferred to the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM), which is part of the Department of Administration.

Despite his concerns about the ability of the state to make the required adjustments to balance the budget, DiPalma said that developmental disability funding is moving in the right direction, with legislators listening to the facts and figures presented to them about the need for quality care.

A more comprehensive picture of the budget is expected to unfold as it goes before the full House and Senate over the next two weeks.