RI DD Direct Care Raises To Kick In Oct. 1

By Gina Macris

Direct care workers employed by private agencies serving persons with developmental disabilities in Rhode Island will have to wait until October to receive raises provided in the state budget that took effect last month.

But when the raises do show up in their paychecks, they’ll be for the full amount – 80 to 85 cents an hour, according to state officials.

A spokesman for Nicholas A. Mattiello, speaker of the House of Representatives, had suggested that raises proposed by Governor Gina Raimondo in her budget plan, and enacted by the legislature, might take effect July 1.

An additional pay boost added in the waning days of the General Assembly session would follow on Oct. 1, the speaker’s aide had said.

But state officials now say that both raises will take effect Oct. 1, allowing time for the state to work with the federal government to make technical changes required in the Medicaid program to incorporate the wage increases.

Direct care workers employed by developmental disability service organizations will receive an estimated 80 to 85-cent hourly pay raise effective Oct. 1, according to state officials.

The General Assembly set aside a total of $9.5 million in federal and state Medicaid funds - including $4.5 million from the state budget- for raises to direct care workers. That total consists of $6.2 million proposed by Governor Gina Raimondo in her original budget plan and an additional $3.3 million added by the House in the waning days of the 2019 session of the General Assembly.

At that time, Mattiello’s spokesman said that the pay increase proposed by the Governor would become effective July 1 and the amount added by the House would kick in Oct. 1.

But the final budget language does not specify an effective date.

In a recent public forum, Kerri Zanchi, director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, said that because the pay raise involves federal Medicaid funds, the state must work with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to make changes to the federally-authorized reimbursement rate the state pays to privately-run service providers for front-line staff.

Unlike previous pay increases enacted by the legislature, the $9.5 million investment in direct care wages will not extend to supervisors, job coaches and other specialists working with adults with developmental disabilities, state officials have said.

Raising the pay of direct care workers is considered a critical issue in employers’ ability to recruit and retain staff at a time when the state relies on some three dozen privately-run agencies to implement the requirements of a 2014 federal civil rights consent decree. Drawing its authority from the 1999 Olmstead decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, the consent decree requires the state to change to an integrated, community-based model of daytime services by 2024, with an emphasis on employment.

According to a budget analysis by the House Fiscal Office, this year’s raises will boost the pay of direct care workers to about $13.00 an hour. But the state and private providers historically have differed on how far raises will go, because the state allows much less for employee benefits and other employment-related overhead than providers say those expenses actually cost.

A trade association of two thirds of private providers in the state says that on average, entry-level employee make about $11.44 an hour, while more experienced direct care workers make an average of about $12.50 an hour. The Connecticut legislature enacted a minimum wage of $14.75 for developmental disability and personal care workers in 2018. Massachusetts pays $15 an hour for personal care workers, a category which includes many who support adults with developmental disabilities.

NESCSO Will Not Offer “Magic Number” on RI DD Rate Review, Leaving Decisions To BHDDH

Rick Jacobsen *** All Photos By Anne Peters

Rick Jacobsen *** All Photos By Anne Peters

By Gina Macris

A consultant to a regional consortium reviewing Rhode Island’s developmental disability service system outlined the scope of the group’s work and time line to a July 30 meeting of a special legislative commission.

The consultant also disclosed some preliminary findings about “Project Sustainability,” the fee-for-service reimbursement system also being studied by the General Assembly’s commission. No one appeared surprised by the early findings.

For example, the developmental disabilities caseload has had a compounded annual growth rate of 3 percent in the last five years, from 3,744 to a current total of 4,297.

And the data shows that the private agencies that provide most of the direct services – and bear the brunt of the work necessary to comply with a federal civil rights agreement - operate on precarious financial margins.

The presentation to the Project Sustainability Commission was made by consultant Rick Jacobsen and his boss, Elena Nicolella, executive director of the New England States Consortium Systems Organization (NESCSO), a non-profit group that provides analysis in the fields of health and human services to five states. The meeting was held at the Arnold Conference Center at the Eleanor Slater Hospital.

Nicolella and Jacobsen encountered pushback when they explained the role defined for NESCSO by the state Department Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals.(BHDDH).

NESCSO will present options to BHDDH for system improvements toward the project goal of maximizing “opportunities for people to fully participate in their community,” according to a Powerpoint presentation that accompanied the talk. But it won’t deliver an independent recommendation or “magic number” on costs, Jacobsen and Nicolella said.

Tom Kane, CEO of AccessPoint RI, a private provider, said long experience in system-wide reform has taught him that the approach chosen by BHDDH is doomed to fail unless the effort also states the true cost of evolving to an integrated community-based model.

L. to R.: Andrew McQuaide, Kim Einloth, Tom Kane

L. to R.: Andrew McQuaide, Kim Einloth, Tom Kane

There has been no “tolerance” for even “having a (public) discussion about the cost of investing in the change process,” said Kane. “If you shift funds in an underfunded system, it’s not going to work. It’s just going to make the hole deeper,” he said.

In the 1980s and 1990s, when advocates pushed to close the Ladd School, the state’s only institution for people with developmental disabilities, “there was a community behind us, and we put an investment in the system in order to make that change happen, and it was dramatic change,” Kane said.

But there was no investment in changing the system in Project Sustainability, enacted in 2011, Kane said.

While the healthcare consultants Burns & Associates recommended an investment that was millions of dollars more than was being spent, Kane said, that number was never made public or discussed in the General Assembly. “What we ended up with was millions of dollars cut,” he said.

A few years later, when the demand grew for more community-based services, those reimbursement rates increased, but rates for center-based care decreased, despite the fact that providers continued to have the same fixed costs, Kane said.

The history of Project Sustainability has prompted a certain amount of “agida” among service providers regarding NESCSO’s work, said Andrew McQuaide, a Commission member.

“Having gone through a similar process and getting an end product that turned the system around and took us backward,”he said, providers are nervous that “we could go through a very similar process and come up with a poor product.”

He said his remarks did not reflect in any way on the current administration. Rebecca Boss, the BHDDH director, and Kerri Zanchi, the director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, are both commission members and attended the meeting.

McQuaide and A. Anthony Antosh, another commission member, both urged Boss to make public all the data and reports produced by NESCSO, whose contract runs through June, 2020.

Antosh said there ought to be a direct relationship between the goals of the rate review and the recommendations of the commission. Commission members have submitted individual recommendations, which all advocate for the self-determination of adults with developmental disabilities. Their work will be synthesized into a final report, according to the commission chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown.

The manner in which NESCSO’s work will be shared with the public is under discussion, Boss said. She and Zanchi said they didn’t think it would be the best use of everyone’s time if the public discussion got bogged down in the minutia of the analytics at each stage in the process.

“We don’t want to be pulled off course but be mindful of the project as a whole,” Zanchi said.

Jacobsen and Nicolella said that NESCSO intends to produce data to enable BHDDH to make both near-term changes and longer-term reforms.

Preliminarily analysis of the audited financial statements of 16 private provider organizations confirms that the system is operating on a very close financial margin, said Jacobsen.

Elena Nicolella

Elena Nicolella

That’s not unusual, he said. Human services agencies across the country are in similar positions. At the same time, the tight finances mean the agencies may tend to be averse to risks like investing in system change or taking on new clients, Jacobsen said.

Jacobsen presented a preliminary analysis of audited financial statements from 16 provider agencies over the last two years, with tables organized according to the number of fiscal reports. The agencies were not identified.

For example, out of a total of 27 audited financial statements, 15 showed deficits and 11 showed surpluses. Of the 11 surpluses, 6 were less than 3 percent of revenues.

In another table summarizing 24 financial statements, 12 of them showed less than a month’s cash on hand at the end of the fiscal year.

And a third table on liquidity said that of a total 24 financial statements, only 4 had working capital to carry their agencies longer than 2 months. At the other extreme, 7 statements said their agencies had no working capital or were lacking up to two months’ worth at the end of the fiscal year.

Jaccobsen said the state has made advance payments to some struggling agencies, but these advances have been carried as liabilities on the books.

Commission members said that for some organizations with multiple sources of income, the agency-wide audited statements do not give an accurate picture of the fiscal margins in developmental disabilities.

Regina Hayes, CEO of Spurwink RI, and Peter Quattromani, CEO of United Cerebral Palsy, suggested that the financial picture is worse than it looked in Jacobsen’s tables and asked him to go back and look only at the income and expenses related to developmental disabilities.

Jacobsen said NESCSO will spend the entire month of August listening to providers. Engagement with consumers and their families is scheduled for September.

An analysis of earnings figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for May, 2018 indicated that the wages for direct care workers in Rhode Island are close to the median in comparison to other states. That doesn’t mean that agencies can hire and retain employees, Jacobsen said.

Here too, Jacobsen was asked to look more closely at the figures.

Louis DiPalma and Rebecca Boss

Louis DiPalma and Rebecca Boss

The commission chairman, DiPalma, said the figures Jacobsen used didn’t account for a raise the Connecticut legislature gave to all its developmental disability direct care workers to a minimum of $14.75. In Massachusetts, 30,000 people working as personal care attendants, including many working with adults with developmental disabilities, make $15 an hour, DiPalma said. And the figures Rhode Island reports to the Bureau of Labor Statistics put developmental disability workers in the same category as home health aides, who make more, DiPalma said. According to a trade association representing two thirds of private providers in Rhode Island, entry-level direct care workers make an average of $11.44 an hour. (They are soon to get raises.)

When Jacobsen mentioned that NESCSO plans to compare Rhode Island’s developmental disability services to those in other states, Kane, the AccessPoint CEO, said the consultants must make sure to include the amounts the other states spend on institutional care.

A comparison of community-based services among states does not yield a true picture of total state spending on developmental disabilities, since most other states also have institutions, Kane said. But Rhode Islanders who in other states would be institutionalized live in the community in Rhode Island instead, said Kane.

Jacobsen also presented other preliminary statistics:

  • There has been a 15 percent compounded increase in the number of people who direct their own programs in the last five years. NECSCO will look further at whether the increase has occurred by choice or whether it results from individuals and families being unable to find suitable services from agencies. “I suspect it’s a mix of both,” Jacobsen said.

  • Of a total of nearly $216.2 million in reimbursement claims paid by the state in the 2018 fiscal year, 51.4 percent was for residential expenses and 48.6 percent was for daytime services, case management, respite care, and independent living or family supports.

· In the category of daytime services, 4.2 percent, or nearly $4.5 million, was spent for employment-related and pre-vocational activities. Increasing employment is one of the main goals of the consent decree.

Federal Monitor Finds “Mixed Results” in RI DD Employment; Urges Expansion Of Efforts

By Gina Macris

A federal court monitor says the state of Rhode Island has had “mixed results” in its efforts to find competitive employment for adults with developmental disabilities as required by a 2014 civil rights decree mandating the state correct violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The monitor, Charles Moseley, has urged the state to take “immediate and tangible steps” to develop the capacity of both state agencies and private service providers “to sustain the high level of training and supported employment activity required by the Consent Decree both now and into the future. “

The state licenses about three dozen private agencies, most of them non-profits, to provide the direct services for adults with developmental disabilities that the state relies on to meet the goals of the consent decree, both for supported employment and non-work activities in the community.

The state has met employment goals for January 1, 2019 in two of three categories of adults with developmental disabilities, those who previously worked in sheltered workshops and those who historically were served in segregated day centers. But the pace of placements has slowed at a time when the requirements of the consent decree are set to accelerate, from 2020 to 2024, according to figures presented by Moseley.

In the first three months of 2019, a total of 18 adults with developmental disabilities landed jobs. That is the second-lowest quarterly total on record for the first five years of the consent decree. The lowest quarterly job placement rate occurred from July through September, 2018, when only 7 individuals got jobs.

Moseley’s report zeroed in on a third category in the consent decree, young adults recently out of high school. The state has never met target numbers for job placements for that group. As of March 31, the number of young adults with part-time jobs stood at 257, or about 62 percent of a population of 412 persons in their twenties.

Moseley said that the state’s performance-based supported employment program, launched in 2017, “did not significantly impact placement numbers” for young adults.

The state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) recently issued a request for proposals for a new iteration of the individualized supported employment program that appears to be tailored to young adults, in that that it seeks clients who have never held jobs.

“We continue to see PCSEPP (The Person-Centered Supported Employment Performance Program) as one of the strategies to increasing employment outcomes,” a BHDDH spokesman said in a statement July 29. “It has provided the state with two years of data-informed outcomes and continues to be responsive to providers’ requests for innovative and flexible resources to promote employment outcomes,” the statement said.

BHDDH set an Aug. 30 deadline for the submission of proposals from private providers, but those agencies have asked for an extension.

At a meeting July 12, representatives of private providers asked for at least three months to plan their programs, because of a requirement that the services reflect a formal collaboration between two or more agencies. The agencies need time to consider structural changes to their operations that may be required by the collaboration, their representatives said.

BHDDH has extended the application deadline to Oct. 4, according to a memo to providers dated July 19.

In his report, Moseley noted that the “state is taking important steps to rebuild the developmental disabilities service delivery system under the Consent Decree.”

He cited efforts by the Division of Developmental Disabilities and the Office of Rehabilitation Services to “establish important links” with providers, families, advocacy organizations and the state Department of Labor and Training to “achieve and sustain supported employment outcomes” among those facing intellectual or developmental challenges. BHDDH is also working with the special legislative commission studying the state’s fee-for-service reimbursement rate, Moseley said. He noted that there has been additional progress in the training of providers’ staff, quality improvement measures and other key areas.

But in a recent conference call with the Employment First Task Force, a community advisory group on implementation of the consent decree, he echoed the conclusion of his most recent quarterly report.

When members of the group thanked Moseley for his work -– he is stepping down as monitor Sept. 30 — and asked him for advice on their recently-completed strategic plan, Moseley said they should focus on one in the plan that concerns providers’ capacity to do their jobs.

Moseley said he has heard “a lot” about adults with developmental disabilities being unable to access any suitable services from a provider and instead choosing to “self-direct.” That means consumers and families design their own programs and hire and supervise staff. The phenomenon has sometimes been called “self-directed by default.”

This is one area that would benefit from a workgroup including providers and state officials to try to “capture” the problem, which can be difficult to document when one family applies to multiple agencies, he said.

Read Moseley’s report here.

(This article has been updated.)

Two RI DD Events Scheduled For Tuesday, July 30

The special legislative commission studying Rhode Island’s reimbursement system for private providers of developmental disability services and the state’s Division of Developmental Disabilities will each hold separate events the afternoon of Tuesday, July 30.

The commission meeting will feature an update on the ongoing rate review from Elena Nicolella, the executive director of the New England States Consortium Systems Organization, which is supervising the work, according to state Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, chairman of the panel..

He said the commission’s regular meeting place, the Senate Lounge in the State House, will not be available that day. The panel will meet at 1 p.m. in the Arnold Conference Center in the Regan Building of Eleanor Slater Hospital, off Howard Avenue in Cranston.

From 4 to 6 p.m., the state Division of Developmental Disabilities will host a community forum at the Cumberland Public Library, 1464 Diamond Hill Rd., Cumberland. Anyone interested in attending may email agenda topics to BHDDH.ASKDD@bhddh.ri.gov (Click the email address or copy and paste it into your email program.)

Feds Consider Early Termination Request For DD Oversight At Mount Pleasant High School

By Gina Macris

A Providence School Department request that the federal government end its oversight of a special education program at Mount Pleasant High School is encountering some resistance and concern because of a more immediate development: The state is taking control of the entire “broken” school district.

Months ago, the city of Providence sought early termination of a landmark federal Interim Settlement Agreement, reached in 2013, in which the school department promised to make major changes in the way special education students at Mount Pleasant High School were being shuttled into a sheltered workshop program in North Providence.

The school system agreed to prepare students in the Birch Vocational Center at Mount Pleasant High School to take advantage of supported employment in the community and to participate in integrated non-work activities in compliance with the integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The U.S. Department of Justice and a federal court monitor are carefully considering the request and have solicited the opinions of various segments of the developmental disabilities community on the pros and cons of terminating the agreement now, a year before it is set to expire.

On July 23, the monitor, Charles Moseley, and Victoria Thomas, a lawyer for the DOJ, discussed possible early termination via conference call with members of the Employment First Task Force (EFTF), an advisory group on matters concerning the 2013 agreement and a broader, statewide consent decree signed in 2014.

On the same day, the Council on Elementary and Secondary Education voted, as anticipated, to empower the state Commissioner of Education to intervene in the Providence School District, taking temporary control, if necessary, of its budget, personnel, and governance.

Thomas said she was concerned about a recent report on Providence schools from Johns Hopkins University’s Institute on Educational Policy which found a deeply dysfunctional system where most students are not learning, principals are struggling to lead, teachers and students don’t feel safe, and some buildings are crumbling around them.

Mount Pleasant High School was one of 12 schools visited by the Johns Hopkins researchers.

At the same time, Thomas said, she personally has been “very impressed with the work Providence has done” with the Mount Pleasant special education students protected by the 2013 Interim Settlement Agreement. Over the last several years, Thomas has participated in many site visits at Mount Pleasant High, as has Moseley, who concurred with Thomas’ assessment. Having done similar visits in other states, Thomas said, she has been “blown away” by the quality of work done to put the needs and wants of students in Providence at the center of their individualized education plans.

“That doesn’t mean that everything is perfect,” Thomas said.

The Interim Settlement Agreement assumes that Mount Pleasant High School students will make a successful transition from school to adult services provided by the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals. And Thomas said some of the comments that have been received from stakeholders in developmental disability services indicate that the DOJ and the monitor “really need to look into adult services.”

The Providence school department’s involvement in the Interim Settlement Agreement is set to expire in July, 2020, as long as the city is in “substantial compliance” a year ahead of time and the changes made during compliance are found to be lasting.

If the DOJ and the monitor agree to “early termination and we’re wrong,” Thomas said, the oversight of the state’s efforts to integrate adults with developmental disabilities in their communities will continue as part of the overlapping statewide consent decree signed in 2014.

“We’re not leaving anyone behind,” she said. Moseley added that the monitor and the DOJ will continue to have access to data about the progress of the same students as they merge into the adult population.

State Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, who attended the task force meeting, expressed concern that even if implementation of the Interim Settlement Agreement has been going well at Mount Pleasant High School, the state of the school system around the program is in question.

Anne Peters, a parent who serves on the task force, asked whether continuing to monitor Mt. Pleasant High might be needed to protect the resources that have been brought to bear to change the prospects for special education students.

“I think we’re expecting quite the chaotic year” in Providence, she said.

“An excellent question,” Moseley said.

Several days before the meeting, Task Force leaders collected comments on early termination that made three main points:

  • There seems to have been significant progress at Mt. Pleasant, with special education students having meaningful work trials

  • Students still leave school unable to get the appropriate employment supports, like those from other communities, because providers are not accepting new referrals.

  • ·The Johns Hopkins report will put Providence under pressure to make many reforms and it would be ill-advised to take the spotlight off students with developmental disabilities for fear they would once again get left behind.

Neither Thomas nor Moseley said when the decision would be made on early termination. Moseley has indicated he plans to complete a report on whether Providence is in substantial compliance with the Interim Settlement Agreement before he steps down as monitor on Sept. 30.

Moseley To Step Down As Court Monitor of RI Olmstead Consent Decree, Citing Health Concerns

Charles Moseley

Charles Moseley

By Gina Macris

Charles Moseley, the independent federal court monitor overseeing implementation of two federal civil rights decrees affecting Rhode Islanders with developmental disabilities, will step down at the end of September because of what he termed “emerging health issues.”

Brian Gosselin

Brian Gosselin

In a related matter, Brian Gosselin, chief strategy officer at the Executive Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS), has been named the state’s consent decree coordinator, a post he has filled on an interim basis twice in the last few years. Rhode Island has had five consent decree coordinators, including Gosselin, in five years.

The personnel changes were announced July 18 by EOHHS. Before Moseley resigns on Sept. 30, he said in his letter, he intends to complete his assessment of whether the city of Providence is in substantial compliance with the first of the two federal agreements, reached in 2013.

In it, the city stopped using the Birch Academy at Mount Pleasant High School as a feeder program for a now-closed sheltered workshop called Training Through Placement and instead pledged to help high school students with intellectual or developmental challenges make the transition to competitive employment in the community.

The 2013 “Interim Settlement Agreement” (ISA) is set to expire in 2020, but lawyers for the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) have said the city must be in “substantial compliance” a year ahead of time. Moseley’s resignation letter indicated he is working on that assessment. The city, meanwhile, has asked for early release from the ISA.

Moseley has served as the federal court monitor since late 2014, a few months after the state and the DOJ settled a broader civil rights complaint saying that Rhode Island’s system for developmentally disabled adults relied too heavily on sheltered workshops and segregated day centers. Former Gov. Lincoln Chafee signed a consent decree with the federal government in which he pledged that the state’s system would be overhauled by 2024, making certain that those who wished to participate in work, learning and recreation in the larger community would be helped to do so.

The 2014 settlement marked the first Olmstead consent decree in the country targeting segregated day services for adults with developmental disabilities. The Olmstead decision of the U.S Supreme Court reinforced the Integration Mandate of the Americans With disabilities Act. Previously, the DOJ had enforced the ruling in connection with segregated housing.

Moseley is a former director of developmental disabilities in Vermont and a former associate executive director of the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services.

A new court monitor would need the approval of the state, the DOJ and Judge John J. McConnell, Jr. of U.S. District Court, who is overseeing the case. McConnell has made it clear that he relies on Moseley’s recommendations in steering the implementation of the consent decree.

In his letter, Moseley said the decision to step away after five years “is a very difficult one to make.”

He said he has enjoyed working with all involved and will miss the “in-depth discussions and negotiations that we have had in our ongoing efforts to achieve the goals and outcomes identified by the two agreements.”

Moseley, who lives in Vermont, has made site visits to Rhode Island several times a year, usually keeping out of the public eye, and has incorporated his observations, as well as data supplied by the state and the city, into quarterly reports to McConnell. He also has attended periodic status conferences on the case before McConnell.

“Implementing comprehensive systems change within the boundaries of the complicated developmental disabilities system is challenging,“ Moseley said. He praised a variety of state and city officials for “actively addressing the changes that must be made.” He also recognized the DOJ lawyers for their “constructive approach and unwavering focus” on individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

RI Advocacy Groups Mark National Disability Voter Registration Week With In-Person, Online Help

By Gina Macris

To mark National Disability Voter Registration Week – now underway – the Rhode Island Disability Law Center will hold a three-hour help session at the Providence Public Library, from 11 a.M. TO 2 P.M. Thursday, July 18, for those who want to get their names on the rolls. (This session was cancelled because of utility work at the library and will be rescheduled, according to Morna Murray, executive director of the Disability Law Center.)

At least two other advocacy organizations – the ARC’s Rhode Island Family Advocacy Network and the Rhode Island Disability Rights and Access Coalition – have launched on-line campaigns to call attention to the rights - and responsibilities – of all adult citizens to register and to vote.

The ARC links to an article in Time magazine which highlights cites a Rutgers University study showing that voting among those with disabilities surged 8.5 percent between 2014 and 2018 nationwide.

But the increase in voting among citizens without disabilities for the same period was 11.9 percent, or 4.7 percent more, the study said.

In Rhode Island, the proportion of voters with disabilities increased 5.3 percent between 2014 and 2018, but among those without disabilities, the surge was 8.6 percent, according to the study.

A total of 14.3 million citizens with disabilities voted in 2018. If people with disabilities voted at the same rate as people without disabilities who have the same demographic characteristics, there would be about 2.35 million more voters, according to the study.

In an email blitz, the Family Advocacy Network included both a telephone number, 401-222-2340, and a link https://vote.sos.ri.gov/ to the website of the Rhode Island Secretary of State, whose office handles voter registration.

Rhode Islanders who have contact with the Division of Motor Vehicles are automatically registered to vote. But many adults with disabilities don’t drive. They may register to vote online, as long as they have a photo ID acceptable to the Secretary of State. A full discussion of acceptable voter identification appears here:

Meanwhile, the Rhode Island Disability Rights and Access Coalition chose this week to launch an Empowering People With Disabilities Campaign through 2020 to register Rhode Islanders to vote and remind them to participate in elections. The campaign links to a customized webpage that lists options for starting the registration process, checking on registration status, requesting an absentee ballot, or choosing an election reminder.

The coalition is also planning events, beginning in the fall, to teach people importance of civic engagement and getting people register to vote, according to a spokeswoman.

RI House Gives Extra Bump To Pay Of Front Line DD Workers As Budget Deliberations Near End

By Gina Macris

The Rhode Island House has added a total of $9.6 million in federal-state Medicaid funding to boost the pay of direct care workers for adults with developmental disabilities in the state budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

The increase, awaiting approval by the Senate, represents the largest single-year investment in wages since drastic cuts were made in 2011. In 2016, the legislature earmarked $5 million for a rate hike, and the next year it added $6.1 million.

But the rates for Rhode Island’s direct care workers still lag behind those of neighboring Connecticut and Massachusetts.

This year’s wage hike is was part of an overall $296.9 million allocation for developmental disabilities, which includes $13 million in federal Medicaid reimbursement to create a third-party case management initiative called a Health Home.

In an unusual Saturday session June 22, the House also addressed a shortfall in the current developmental disabilities budget, adding $2.9 million in supplemental funding.

Developmental disability services encompass both the private system serving about 4,000 clients and a state-operated network of group homes for about 125 individuals, accounting for more than half the spending in the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH). The House-authorized spending cap for BHDDH in the next budget is $463.2 million.

A spokesman for House Speaker Nicholas A. Mattiello explained a floor amendment that raised the total earmarked for a wage increase in Governor Gina Raimondo’s budget from $6.4 million to $9.6 million.

Larry Berman said the governor’s $6.4 million, including $3 million in state funding and $3.4 million in federal reimbursements, will mean a 41-cent raise to the hourly rate for direct support workers on July 1. The hourly rate, which he put at an average of $12.27, would rise to $12.68, Berman said.

The additional $3.2 million in the floor amendment, including $1.5 in state revenue, will be applied Oct. 1, triggering an additional wage hike of 41 cents an hour, for a total hourly rate of $13.09 during the last nine months of the fiscal year, Berman said.

In the past, increases for direct care workers have meant that supervisors and other support personnel have also received raises. But Berman confirmed that this year, the allocation earmarked for pay bumps apply only to front-line caregivers. In all, about 4,000 work in the private sector in the field of developmental disability services.

Berman’s figures refer to the basic hourly wage rate in the BHDDH reimbursement model for private providers, but that doesn’t mean each direct care worker will get the increase he cited.

Many variables exist in the way each of the providers figures out how much to pay workers and how much to set aside for benefits and other employer-related expenses. All that means that the amount of the actual wage hikes will vary.

In the past, the state and the private providers have differed on how far a rate hike will go.

In a statement, Mattiello took credit for redirecting additional funds to direct care workers.

“When about $1 million was identified as available in the budget, I suggested it go to those workers who are providing outstanding care to the developmentally disabled community. They deserve this rate increase.”

The Community Provider Network of Rhode Island, (CPNRI) a trade association of about two dozen providers, posted its thanks on Facebook:

“CPNRI is pleased to see the commitment of the Speaker, Senate President and Governor and all the Representatives and Senators who have supported increased wages for DD workers in Rhode Island in the 2020 budget. This investment not only will raise wages for this invaluable workforce, it supports individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to lead meaningful lives in our communities. Thank you to all who have prioritized this workforce.”

The wage increase is assured passage in the Senate, where developmental disability services have the support of the leadership, including Senate President Dominick J. Ruggerio, William J. Conley, Jr., Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee; and Sen. LouisA. DiPalma, first vice-chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

The extra push in funding occurred just as Mattiello sought to tamp down a controversy involving a Cranston chiropractor, who was to receive a $1 million authorization to bill the state for services for an unproven neurological treatment for traumatic head injury and other disorders that failed to qualify for federal Medicaid reimbursement..

On June 20, Mattiello announced he would pull the $1 million in funding from Victor Pedro, because the issue had become too controversial and he wanted to avoid a lengthy floor battle, even though he still supported the chiropractor.

Berman said most of the last-minute $1.5 million-increase in worker wages came from the allocation that Mattiello pulled from the chiropractor, along with funds from various other accounts.

Spending for already-established developmental disability programs and services from all revenue sources in the next fiscal year would be capped at $284 million – about $12.3 million more than originally approved for the current fiscal year. Most of that figure comes from the federal-state Medicaid program.

Meanwhile, the House approved a revised developmental disabilities budget of slightly over $274.6 million for the current fiscal year, which is $2.9 million more than the $271.7 million the General Assembly enacted a year ago.

The revised figure includes about $1.7 million in state revenue that represents an adjustment for an audit finding that the state was incorrectly leveraging federal Medicaid money to pay for fire code upgrades in group homes and other facilities serving adults with developmental disabilities, Berman said. Capital projects are now all assigned to the Department of Administration, he said.

Without supplemental funding and savings in other BHDDH accounts, the cost of services in the privately-run developmental disability system would have exceeded the amount the General Assembly originally allocated by about $3.8 million in General revenue.

A third-quarter spending report prepared by BHDDH said that the total state share of Medicaid-funded direct services in the private system is projected at about $111.4 million by June 30. The enacted budget for the current fiscal year allows $107.6 million in that category, but the supplemental funding recommended by the Governor and approved by the House reduces the projected shortfall in state funds to about $152,000, when combined with savings in other accounts.

In the third-quarter spending report for the current fiscal year, BHDDH officials project about a 1.5 percent increase in overall caseload growth and a $1.5 million increase in supplemental funding to clients who successfully appeal the individual amounts allocated for their services.

Counting all the Governor’s proposed supplemental funding for BHDDH in all three divisions, as well as savings in some budget line items, the department projected a year-end surplus of about $438,000 as of March 31.

RI Budget Controversy Touching House Speaker Yields Extra Money For DD Worker Raises

By Gina Macris

Bowing to intense political pressure, Rhode Island House Speaker Nicholas A. Mattiello said June 20 that he will pull a $1-million budget line item for an unproven neurological service that doesn’t qualify for Medicaid funding and reallocate most of the money to raises for those who care for adults with developmental disabilities.

The budget, passed by the House Finance Committee June 13, now contains $3 million in state funding and $3.4 million in federal Medicaid funding – a total of $6.4 million – to raise the pay of direct care workers, who earn significantly less than those doing the same job in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

On the Tara Granahan morning show on WPRO radio, Mattiello said he continues to support chiropractor Victor Pedro of Cranston, who practices what he calls Cortical Integrative Therapy (CIT). The Speaker said he is removing the $1 million from the proposed budget “only because it’s politically controversial.”

“Do I think that’s the right thing to do? I’m not convinced of that, but we’re going to pull it because the issue has become very controversial,” Mattiello told Granahan.

Mattiello’s spokesman, Larry Berman, said later in the day that most of the $1 million allocation for CIT will be added to the raises for direct care workers because “Speaker Mattiello believes these are some of the hardest-working and dedicated employees in the state.”

The General Assembly’s leading champion of adults with developmental disabilities, Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, tweeted his appreciation for Mattiello’s decision to re-direct the funds to the wage raises. “THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!!!! It is needed, most welcomed and greatly appreciated!!!!!”

Even if all $1 million were added to a line item set aside in the budget for the raises, the total would still be far below the $28.5 million advocates have sought in state funding to stabilize the workforce, plagued by high turnover and a high job vacancy rate.

Berman could not say exactly how much will go to the raises. The breakdown will be available when the full House convenes June 21 to consider the state’s $9.9 billion- budget for the fiscal year which begins July 1, he said.

Any addition of state funds to worker pay will generate about 52 cents on the dollar in federal Medicaid reimbursement, in effect doubling the amount available.

Without the extra allocation, the proposed budget’s $6.4 million for wage hikes would add an average of 34 to 44 cents an hour to the pay of about 4000 direct care workers. Private providers and state government differ on their estimates of how far the money will go.

Entry-level direct care workers make an average of $11.44 an hour, according to a trade association of service providers, while more experienced colleagues are paid an average of $12.50 an hour. The Connecticut legislature enacted a minimum wage of $14.75 for personal care workers in 2018, and Massachusetts pays about $15 an hour.

On the morning talk show, Mattiello defended the chiropractor, who has donated to several political campaigns, including his own, even while he explained why he is pulling the money.

“I’m going to have a terrible debate on the (House) floor. So politics is what it is, and I’m going to do something that I should not do,” Mattiello said.

“I will continue to support the doctor because I think he brings a unique and special treatment to a lot of kids and folks who have no place else to go.”

While Mattiello said Pedro has had “great success,” the federal Medicaid program has turned down the state’s request for federal reimbursement for the treatments because of a lack of scientific evidence that they are effective.

Mattiello said he met Pedro in connection with his law practice before he was elected to the General Assembly and was impressed by the testimonials of his patients.

One of Pedro’s patients was the late father of former Rep. Frank Montanaro, Jr., Mattiello said in the radio interview. Montanaro now works as executive director of the financial and administrative office of the General Assembly.

The first budget allocation for CIT dates back more than a decade. Since Governor Gina Raimondo took office in 2015, her administration has tried to cut the CIT allocation out of the budget, without success.

Mattiello’s latest attempt to restore funding for Pedro that had been cut by the Raimondo administration caught the eye of blogger Steve Ahlquist of Uprise RI. His investigative article sparked the outrage of the state Republican Party and numerous other critics of the Speaker.

Collaboration Needed to Find Jobs, Solve Transportation Problems, For People With DD

By Gina Macris

For people with developmental disabilities, reliable public transportation – or the lack of it – can mean the difference between accepting a job offer and staying home.

A Coventry, RI man who had a chance to work at a Home Depot near his home faced that dilemma when he learned that the state’s paratransit system for people with disabilities could not go into the shopping center where the store is located.

To solve the transportation problem, the man’s family and his job developer, Rory Carmody, Director of Program Services at AccessPoint RI, pitch in to drive him to and from work, said Carmody’s boss, Tom Kane. But the hours the man can work are limited to the times Carmody and the man’s family are available for drop-off and pick-up, said Kane.

Kane, the CEO of AccessPoint, shared the story in a conversation after a June 18 meeting of a special legislative commission studying Project Sustainability, the state’s fee-for-service reimbursement system for private services for adults with developmental disabilities.

L to R: Scott Jensen and Scott Avedesian

L to R: Scott Jensen and Scott Avedesian

The session focused on the intersection of jobs and transportation, featuring remarks from three speakers:

· Scott Avedesian, CEO of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA)

· Scott Jensen, Director of the Department of Labor and Training (DLT)

· Robert Kalaskowski, Chief of Policy and Planning for the Governor’s Workforce Board.

The example of the Coventry man illustrates the challenges of relying on the paratransit program, which operates only along corridors that mimic RIPTA’s regular bus routes. The shared RIde program for people with disabilities may drop off and pick up at sites no more than three-quarters of a mile outside a regular bus route, according to the RIPTA website.

Because RIPTA doesn’t send regular buses to Little Compton or Foster, the RIde option for residents with disabilities is not available either, said Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown. And, he added, there’s only one public transit stop in Tiverton.

Recently, the directors of the agencies responsible for services for the elderly and those with intellectual and developmental disabilities accompanied Avedesian on a paratransit run that picked up four individuals, one of them in a wheelchair, and took them to their various destinations.

Rebecca Boss, the director of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH), said it was a “really good experience for everyone to see the hands-on, labor-intensive type of transit that we perform.”

For the officials, the experience took two and a half hours, from the time the van left the RIPTA garage to get the first client until the time it returned, Avedesian and Boss agreed. It happened to be a day with a lot of traffic, Avedesian added.

Even though the clients weren’t on the van all that time, Kate Sherlock, a commission member, said the run took too long. “I cry when I have to be in the car for two hours,” she said.

Avedesian said that for him, the biggest takeaway from the experience was the need for matching the locations of clients and available jobs to minimize travel time, “so that we’re not taking someone all the way from Woonsocket to Newport.”

Avedesian said he’s impressed by the “intensive amount of time, money and labor involved in moving one person from one end of the state to the other.”

DiPalma said the average cost of a paratransit run is $34, but the program is reimbursed roughly $8 to $14 of that cost, depending on the intensity of the client’s disability. He said the reimbursements are Medicaid-authorized federal and state transportation dollars assigned to BHDDH clients to cover travel. No public transit system in the country is financially self-sufficient, DiPalma noted.

DiPalma has convened an informal group of representatives of public and private agencies who are interested in solving the transportation problems of people with disabilities. The agencies include BHDDH , DLT, RIPTA, the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island, the Providence Chamber of Commerce, the office of U.S. Rep. James Langevin, and others, he said.

Moving forward, transportation must become more malleable to the needs of the people, he said. If someone lives in Glocester and has a job in Newport, that person may be able to get work closer to home, but “if that’s the job they have, that’s the job they have,” DiPalma said.

Jensen

Jensen

Jensen of DLT offered a different way of looking at the transportation problem.

If people with developmental disabilities can be viewed as a source of excellent workers, rather than a population needing support, a stronger argument can be made for investing more in transportation, because of the value this group brings to the economy, he said.

“The company will be receiving value, the person will be paying income tax and can buy more things than they otherwise would,” Jensen said.

He said “coalitions of the willing” are “trying to find those positions where companies recognize the value of people with developmental disabilities. That takes time.”

He said a “handful” of companies, like Home Depot and CVS, have made the “moral choice” to employ individuals with developmental disabilities.

“We want to also help make this a practical choice” for many businesses, Jensen said, by starting with employers’ demands and finding the right match in the labor force - “the right person, in the right place, at the right time, and with the right skill set.”

BHDDH officials recently put the employment rate for adults with developmental disabilities at 29 percent.

Kalaskowski

Kalaskowski

Kalaskowski, of the Governor’s Workforce Board, said the state is promoting that strategy in the Real Pathways program, part of the broader Real Jobs initiative.

In Real Pathways, DLT works with private providers of employment-related services for adults with developmental disabilities, promoting collaboration among job developers to find the best match between the employer’s demand and worker skills.

A job developer working alone may not have just the right client and face the choice of either forcing a match that won’t work out in the long run or letting a relationship with an employer die, Kalaskowski said. In a network of job developers, one may pass along a lead to another and they will return the favor down the line, he said.

Andrew McQuaide, a senior director with Perspectives Corporation, said Jensen and his team deserve “a lot of credit” for fostering a culture of collaboration.

McQuaide recalled how one man with developmental disabilities connected with a training opportunity offered by the Rhode Island Nursery and Landscape Association because both he and AccessPoint’s Rory Carmody “spread the word.”

Then, when a job with a landscaping company opened up, someone in the community who knew the man from the RINLA training recommended him for the position. The man got the job “not because DLT put any dollars forward,” McQuaide said, but because of the “culture and the connections” that DLT promoted.

Boss, the BHDDH director, said she is excited about the collaboration with DLT. Tracey Cunningham, the director of employment services, and other dedicated officials at BHDDH do a good job in helping adults with developmental disabilities find work, but the staff at DLT “lives, eats and breathes” jobs, she said.

The next meeting of the Project Sustainability commission, set for June 25, has been cancelled because of likely schedule conflicts as the General Assembly wraps up its 2019 session, DiPalma said. He said the meeting will be re-scheduled sometime in July.

RI House Finance Committee Approves Wage Increases For Workers in DD Budget For FY 20

By Gina Macris

The Rhode Island House Finance Committee has approved Governor Gina Raimondo’s proposed pay raises for workers who care for adults with developmental disabilities, far below what advocates say is needed.

Money for the wage increases, a total of $6.4 million in federal and state Medicaid funding, is part of an overall $293.7 million spending authorization for developmental disabilities in the next budget cycle.

The Finance Committee approval of the raises is welcome news, said State Sen. Louis DiPalma, the General Assembly’s most visible proponent of better pay for direct care workers. But he said much work is needed for direct care workers to gain pay parity with their counterparts in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Total spending for developmental disabilities includes almost $131.4 million in the state’s share of Medicaid-funded services for adults with developmental disabilities, with a federal match of about $147 million for existing programs. An additional $13 million federal investment is budgeted for a Health Home, a proposed third-party entity that would provide case management services now done by state workers.

The $293.7 million allocation also includes about $1.8 million in non-Medicaid funding.

The wage increase would add an average of 34 to 44 cents an hour to the pay of direct care workers. Private providers and state government differ on their estimates of how far the money will go.

Entry-level direct care workers make an average of $11.44 an hour, according to a trade association of service providers, while more experienced colleagues are paid an average of $12.50 an hour. Those rates are significantly lower than their counterparts earn in neighboring Massachusetts and Connecticut, according to testimony submitted to the House Finance Committee earlier this year.

Advocates had asked the General Assembly to invest an additional $28.5 million in state revenue to boost wages and stabilize the workforce in developmental disabilities, which is plagued by high turnover and a high job vacancy rate.

Convening late the evening of June 13, the Finance Committee made recommendations both on revised spending for the current fiscal year, ending June 30, and the budget for the new cycle beginning July 1. The totality of spending in the new state budget would be about $9.8 billion.

The full House is scheduled to take up the Finance Committee recommendations June 21.

RI DD Rate Reviewers Asked To Fix Payment System That Still Promotes Segregated Care

By Gina Macris

This article was updated June 17 with a response from the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals.

The Rhode Island state agency which funds services for adults with developmental disabilities has acknowledged for the first time that its underlying reimbursement system for private providers is structurally deficient for complying with the Americans With Disabilities Act as required by a 2014 federal civil rights decree.

While the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) has pursued services promoting greater independence for adults with developmental disabilities, “the underlying reimbursement system has lagged,” according to a statement of the scope of work outlined for a consortium tasked with reviewing reimbursement rates.

The rate structure “is grounded in past practices and cost bases associated with the provision of services in the sheltered workshop setting,” BHDDH officials wrote.

“In order to adequately meet consumers’ needs, providers have been paid supplemental funds to address the deficiency in the payment rates,” BHDDH explained in the contract.

BHDDH has a contract with the New England States Consortium Systems Organization (NESCSO) to update a rate structure that has not been reviewed for eight years and to suggest alternates to the current payment methods.

In describing the work ahead for NESCSO, BHDDH says it is:

“seeking to further promote the development of a service system and associated reimbursement arrangements that maximize the opportunity for persons with DD to participate to the fullest possible in community-based activities.”

In 2014 the U.S. Department of Justice found that the reimbursement system incentivized segregated care in sheltered workshops and day centers in violation of the Integration Mandate of the ADA, reinforced by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Olmstead decision.

The Obama administration began vigorously enforcing the Olmstead decision in 2009, but the consent decree in Rhode Island was the first settlement that addressed segregation in daytime services rather than housing.

The consent decree provides a decade-long period of federal oversight of the state’s efforts to change the system. Enforcement of the consent decree entered its sixth year April 9. It will take at least another year for changes in rates and payment methods to go into effect, with the approval of the General Assembly. Enforcement of the decree is set to expire in 2024, but the state would have to show substantial compliance before federal oversight ends.

While some improvements in services have been made, the contract with NESCSO indicates that BHDDH officials believe the reimbursement system has held back compliance efforts.

Staffing Ratios Hinder Needed Flexibility

The underlying problem, said the BHDDH director in an interview, is a rule that requires a ratio of 60 percent funding for community-based activities and 40 percent funding for center-based daytime care in each client’s individual authorization.

The contract language alludes to this situation in describing staffing ratios. It says two areas of “particular focus” are daytime rates paid for employment-related and non-work services. In sheltered settings, for example, there might be one worker for every ten clients. But in the community the number of clients for each worker would have to be much smaller.

Rebecca Boss, the BHDDH director, said the department seeks a “predictable rate structure not driven by very precise ratios” but rather by the needs and preferences of individual clients.

The supplemental payments intended to mitigate the deficiencies in the underlying system “are an increasing portion of overall payments, reflecting the inadequacy of the current rates,” the contract language explained.

According to department officials, that language was meant to refer to the historical trend, in which supplemental payments had increased to as much as $7.8 million in a three-month period.

Boss froze new approvals at the end of 2017, except for emergency health and safety considerations and a couple other narrowly defined exceptions, to try to curb a multi-million dollar deficit at a time when Governor Gina Raimondo seemed inclined to cut developmental disability services significantly.

According to records BHDDH turns in to the General Assembly every month, the supplemental payments from January through March of this year have declined to $3.6 million, about half the total for the same period in 2018.

Historically, supplemental payments have been awarded only when consumers, families, or providers have made successful appeals of individual authorizations. The appeals, which often have required considerable time and energy, must be made annually, or the authorization reverts to the original amount. The appeals process is but one facet of what many families and providers describe as an unstable system.

Kerri Zanchi, director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, said supplemental payments are still a big part of reimbursements to private providers, and BHDDH wants NESCSO and its consultants to scrutinize them as part of the review process.

Study Commission To Hear from NESCSO

The rate review coincides with the work of a special legislative commission studying the current reimbursement system, called Project Sustainability.

On June 18, the commission will meet to hear presentations about employment and transportation issues from Scott Jensen, director of the Department of Labor and Training; and from Scott Avedesian, CEO of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority.

On June 25, the executive director of NESCSO, Elena Nicolella, is scheduled to appear before the commission to give an update on the rate review now being conducted by four consultants under NESCSO’s supervision.

In the meantime, some commission members have given BHDDH their own statements on how they think consultants should approach the work and their ideas for a new system of services that allow consumers and their families to shape the way state funds are used.

A spokeswoman for providers has urged NESCSO and its consultants to gain a thorough understanding of what it costs for a private agency to provide services under the terms of recently-revised regulations for provider operations and quality certification standards.

These bureaucratic steps are part of the state’s efforts to comply with the consent decree and the federal Medicaid Home And Community Based Final Rule (HCBS). Like the consent decree, HCBS embraces the integration mandate of the ADA, but it is a nationwide rule applying to all community-based services funded by Medicaid.

Paradox In Unspent Funds For Employment

Tina Spears, executive director of the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island, warned that simply looking at the way providers utilize the current reimbursement model, which is based on segregated care, will not give the complete picture of the needs of the system.

She did not mention specifics, but a case in point is the performance-based supported employment program, which was funded by a $6.8 million allocation made by the General Assembly in the fiscal year that began July 1, 2016. That allocation still has not been completely spent.

Excluding a start-up period from January through June of 2017, the program spent $2.5 million the first year, from July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. It’s expected to spend $4 million in the fiscal year ending June 30, according to a BHDDH spokesman.

Providers initially complained that they could not meet their costs with the series of one-time incentives offered by the program, which was built on same reimbursement system designed for center-based care.

Incentives and enhancements were made more generous during the second year, and negotiations are underway for a third year of the program.

In the meantime, Rhode Island’s last sheltered workshop closed last year and BHDDH says community-based, competitive employment has increased to about 29 percent of adults with developmental disabilities.

A study released by two nationwide associations of providers in January said Rhode Island’s rate of competitive employment was about 19 percent, but that figure dated from 2015. The “Case for Inclusion” ranked Rhode Island 32nd in the nation on its integration efforts. It was compiled by ANCOR - the American Network of Community Options and Resources, and UCP – United Cerebral Palsy.

Consumers Want More Control Over Money Assigned To Them

Kevin Nerney, executive director of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities Council, and Kelly Donovan, who receives state-funded supports, each called for a system that allows greater consumer control of state funding and greater flexibility in the way it is used.

The state should “ensure that funding is available across all imaginable living arrangements,” particularly in situations where a consumer owns or rents a property and a caregiver or family would like to move in. The caregiver or consumer should be allowed a stipend, as is permitted in many other states, to make this type of arrangement viable, Nerney said.

The state should also ensure that adults with developmental disabilities have the support of familiar staff while they are hospitalized to avoid the trauma of being in an unfamiliar environment where they can neither make themselves understood nor understand what is being said to them, Nerney said.

In addition, the state should adopt a way to assess the support a person receives from family or friends in deciding funding levels. While most of those receiving services from the Division of Developmental Disabilities live in the family home, that home may include a large healthy family, a single aging parent, or a grandparent with Alzheimer’s and a sibling who also has significant needs for support, Nerney said.

And he called for more funding for those hired by self-directed consumers and their families to write support plans necessary to qualify for state funding. The expectations for the plan writers have multiplied over the last 20 years but the fees remains the same at $500 for the initial plan and $350 for an annual renewal, Nerney said. There should be an allowance for self-directed families who need ongoing coordination of services, he said.

Kelly Donovan, who herself receives services from BHDDH gave a concrete example of what greater control and flexibility might look like.

She said people should be able to enjoy an outing without:

A: going home early because a staffer’s shift ends

B: taking everyone in your group home with you, even if one or more of them really didn’t want to come.

“People should be able to have their designated time to themselves and opportunities to be involved in community activities,” she said.

The public may submit comments or questions about the rate review process by email at BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov. Please copy and paste the email address into your email program, or get a link by visiting http://www.bhddh.ri.gov/developmentaldisabilities/community_forums_event.php

In response to this article, Randal Edgar, a spokesman for BHDDH, released the following statement on June 17:

The article published on June 12 on the Olmstead Updates blog presents a misleading picture of Rhode Island’s system of care for adults with developmental disabilities.

The headline claims this system “promotes segregated care.”

This assertion is false.

The article attempts to back up this assertion up by referring to language in a state contract with a consultant that is reviewing the rates paid to DD providers. But in referencing the contract language, the article misreads the intent of that language.

The contract language speaks from a historical perspective. It states that while the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals has pursued the development of “a services system that supports greater independence” for the DD population, “the underlying reimbursement system has lagged.” It goes on to say that the “basis for the development of prevailing rates is grounded in past practices and cost bases associated with the provision of services in the sheltered workshop setting.”

Acknowledging that the existing rates are grounded in past practices and need to be updated is not the same as saying the system as it operates today promotes segregated care, and in saying it does, the article ignores and/or minimizes many steps the department has taken to improve the care provided to adults with developmental disabilities. It should be noted that the reporter met with BHDDH officials for more than an hour but did not press this assertion and obtain their view of the contract language.

The article is wrong again when it states that department froze new approvals for supplemental payments in 2017 to help offset a budget deficit. The department reduced those approvals, applying more stringent standards, not because of a possible budget deficit but because this made sense from a policy standpoint.

Finally, the article gives voice to people outside the department, asking them to describe where the DD care system should go, without giving BHDDH officials a chance to share their vision. In the process, it conveys a false impression that BHDDH officials are not passionate about moving this system forward.

We are disappointed that the article did not present a more complete and accurate picture.

Separately, the public may submit comments or questions about the rate review process by email at BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov. Please copy and paste the email address into your email program, or get a link by visiting http://www.bhddh.ri.gov/developmentaldisabilities/community_forums_event.php

RI “Not Far” From Institutional System Of DD Services, Antosh Tells Legislative Commission

A. Anthony Antosh

A. Anthony Antosh

By Gina Macris

Other than moving people out of institutional living with the closing of the Ladd School in 1994, Rhode Island hasn’t made life appreciably better for adults with developmental disabilities, according to state’s most prominent academic in the field.

A. Anthony Antosh, director of the Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College, said that every week he gets calls from parents who say how “complicated it has gotten” to deal with state-funded services and “how unstable the system is.”

“Our system is not institutional, but it’s not far from that,” Antosh said. He has been active as an educator and researcher in the field of developmental disabilities since the 1970s and was a plaintiff in a lawsuit that ultimately closed the Ladd School.

If the state transfers control of its services – even partially -- to the people who are served, “you begin to change what the system looks like,” he said. Individuals will become “more responsible for themselves.”

Antosh made the comments May 22 as a member of the Project Sustainability Commission, a special legislative commission studying the current state of developmental disability services. Antosh and other commissioners outlined their reform suggestions at the session.

He zeroed in on a requirement now in place that sets out ratios for staffing according to the degree to which a person is perceived to be disabled – a “naive notion” in his view. The ratios allow one-to-one or small group staffing only for the most challenged individuals and were designed for day care facilities or sheltered workshops.

The funding rule remains in place even though the state in April entered the sixth year of a ten-year agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice requiring it to change to an integrated, community-based system of care. The last sheltered workshop in Rhode Island closed last year.

Antosh said an alternative structure could be a community support team responsible for a certain number of people. The team would figure out how to arrange its time to meet the individual needs of its clients in the community.

DD Council Weighs In

Kevin Nerney, executive director of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities Council, also said that he wanted a system “driven by the person and the family.”

There is much talk about “person-centered planning,” he said, but “sometimes, the person is at the center and the other people are doing the planning.”

Nerney recommended that the person receiving services and the family take the lead in drawing up a plan for life in the community. They would be guided by an independent facilitator, not by someone who works for the state funding agency or a private service provider.

The individual and the family would have control over the budget assigned to them and would be able to hire whom they choose to provide paid supports.

Until recently, Nerney said, individuals and families who direct their own services were allowed to use the money allotted to them only to pay for support workers.

Those who choose to receive services from an agency should at least know how much money goes into each category of support, Nerney said.

Antosh, meanwhile, said that funding should be organized by function so that individuals and families have a clearer idea of its purpose.

The notion that plan-making and case management should be separated from the funding agency and the service provider is already embedded in federal Medicaid rules under the title of “conflict free case management.”

“Health Home” Merits Debated

The state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) wants to set up a Medicaid-funded “Health Home” as an independent planning and case management entity for persons with developmental disabilities.

But some commission members have wondered aloud whether a Health Home would be just another layer of bureaucracy.

And Nerney said most people don’t even like the term “conflict-free case management.”

Antosh agreed that “conflict-free case management” should be made simple. The state should have a list of trained independent facilitators, or “navigators,” as he referred to them, to help individuals and families develop plans and mediate any differences among those contributing to an individual plan.

Individuals and families should have a choice of managing their own services, signing up with an agency, or designing a customized combination of self-directed supports and agency-managed services, he said.

Tom Kane, Left, With Antosh

Tom Kane, Left, With Antosh

Tom Kane, who represented a service provider’s perspective, agreed that the people should be in control, with the services following their needs.

To lay the groundwork for real choice, the system should help adults with developmental disabilities “discover their options,” and providers should follow their lead in delivering services, said Kane, CEO of AccessPoint RI.

Kane recommended a concerted statewide marketing campaign aimed at employers that promotes adults with developmental disabilities as an enthusiastic and reliable workforce.

Several other recommendations from Kane echoed recurring issues among members of the commission including:

  • A need for funding that reflects the real costs of services, as well as salaries that will attract and retain talented employees. Recommendations that arise from the review of the funding model and rates that is now underway should be presented to the General Assembly “without edit,” Kane said, and should be used as the basis of funding a new system. He noted that the last review came up with recommendations which the legislature never used.

  • Concerns about a lack of housing options

  • A need for consumers’ access to technology to help them achieve the greatest independence possible.

A Call For A More Stable Funding Cycle

All the commission members, except Antosh, favor annualized budgets for individuals. Antosh said arrangements should be made in two-year increments for funding and services. He also said that there should be a single streamlined application process, no matter the source of the funding, which may come from BHDDH, the Office of Rehabilitative Services, or the Department of Labor and Training.

Families of youngsters deemed eligible for adult services while they are still in high school should also get a budget for exploratory activities, because they don’t know what choices are possible until they experience various options, he said.

The state now determines funding levels annually on paper but reserves the right to change the amount actually released for spending every three months – on a quarterly basis. Families and providers agree that the quarterly allocation - the only one like it in the nation – is a major impediment to the systematic planning necessary for a stable system of supports.

Kane provided some history on the quarterly allocations:

In 2010, he said, payments to private service providers ran over budget and the state told them their reimbursements would be cut for two months – one month retroactively – to make up the difference.

Some providers sued, Kane said, arguing that the state was still obliged to fulfill its contract with them. The providers won, but the next year, in 2011, BHDDH introduced quarterly allocations along with Project Sustainability, the fee-for-service system that significantly reduced reimbursements and is at the center of the commission’s deliberations.

Mental Health Services Lag

The issue of mental health received considerable attention, with Nerney recommending that the system develop and implement a variety of strategies to prevent crises or resolve them once they occur.

Nerney supported the idea of a mobile crisis unit that he said was suggested by Gloria Quinn, Executive Director of West Bay Residential Services, at the previous commission meeting May 6.

Quinn recommended convening a group to explore successful practices in supporting those with complex mental health and behavioral needs in the community, minimizing the need for excessive psychiatric hospitalization.

Rebecca Boss, the BHDDH executive director, and Kerri Zanchi, the Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, both indicated they are aware of a need for greater support and intervention in the area of behavioral health for persons with developmental disabilities.

“We don’t have a good handle on the needs of families in crisis,” Zanchi said.

The assessment tool that BHDDH uses to determine funding levels, the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS), garnered a new round of criticism, despite efforts in 2016 to reframe the questions it asks to better identify support needs and the re-training of all the social workers who conduct the highly scripted interviews..

L To R, Kerri ZanCHI, Brian Gosselin, Acting Consent Decree Coordinator; Christopher Semonelli, Peter Quattromani. All Are Commission Members

L To R, Kerri ZanCHI, Brian Gosselin, Acting Consent Decree Coordinator; Christopher Semonelli, Peter Quattromani. All Are Commission Members

Critic Says Assessment Method Is “Demeaning”

Peter Quattromani, executive director of United Cerebral Palsy RI and spokesman for the Providers Council, said the state should return to using the Personal Capacity Inventory to identify funding needs because it reflects a more collaborative approach than the SIS.

Quattromani said he sat in on several SIS interviews and found the SIS to be a “very demeaning experience” with “very intrusive questions.” In some cases the interview varied, depending on who was asking the questions, he said.

Antosh said when parents experience the SIS for the first time, “they are absolutely horrified by it.”

He suggested that when the SIS was first piloted, it was not intrusive. It was “a conversation”, albeit a lengthy one, lasting for or five hours, Antosh said. Afterward the responses were correlated with funding needs.

Antosh said the SIS was designed to help professionals develop support plans, not as a funding tool, even though Rhode Island and other states use it that way.

Antosh said he would recommend that Rhode Island design its own assessment tool, not necessarily eliminating the SIS but using multiple factors to determine funding, including an exploration of behavioral health issues and other areas not covered in the SIS.

Heather Mincey, assistant director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities, said not all the comments abut the SIS process she has received from families have been negative, with some parents saying it “wasn’t all that bad.”

The May 22 meeting concluded individual members’ presentations on recommendations for change, which will be reviewed and consolidated along common themes and incorporated into a plan for moving forward, said the Commission chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown.

He said he anticipated a five-year process for implementation, with the aim of making Rhode Island achieve top national ranking among state systems of developmental disability services.

In the meantime, DiPalma said that he next commission meeting, on June 18, will feature remarks by the state Director of Labor and Training, Scott R. Jensen; and the CEO of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority, Scott Avedesian Employment and transportation are two topics that have sparked a lot of complaints, DiPalma said. He said he expects the commission to continue meeting into July.

"Project Sustainability” Commission To Continue Hearing Members’ Recommendations May 22

By Gina Macris

Members of a special legislative commission studying Rhode Island’s funding of services for adults with developmental disabilities are expected to finish presenting their recommendations for change at the commission’s next meeting Wednesday, May 22, according to the chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma.

The recommendations which have been aired coalesce around a vision of a future in which adults with developmental disabilities get the supports they need to live where they want, find a job, and do what they want in their spare time, just like anyone else, in keeping with the integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act. That mandate is reflected both in the Medicaid Home and Community Based Rule (HCBS) and the 2014 federal consent decree between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice.

To realize an inclusive future, it is critical that the state adopt an alternative to the current fee-for-service funding model, which poses “challenges and barriers” for the for the privately-run system of developmental disability services, DiPalma said.

The state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) has begun a review of the rates and the rate model for paying private providers and invites public comment by email at this address: BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov (Please copy and paste the email address.)

DiPalma said commission members have submitted comments on the rate review to BHDDH. In addition, the recommendations aired so far have sounded some common themes, including a need for better transportation and a desire for a seamless bureaucracy that can meet the needs of individuals at all stages of life, DiPalma said.

The transition between special education services in high school and the adult service system has been compared to “falling off a cliff” by many parents, according to anecdotal reports to the commission.

DiPalma said he will ask RIPTA, the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority, and the Department of Labor and Training to become directly involved in efforts to redesign the developmental disabilities service system. The consent decree, which resulted in the elimination of sheltered workshops in Rhode Island, calls on the state to increase supports to adults with developmental disabilities seeking jobs in the community.

The May 22 commission meeting will begin at 2 p.m. in the Senate Lounge at the State House.

RI DD System Needs Stable Funding For Quality Services and Productive Lives - Commission

By Gina Macris

A successful model for funding Rhode Island’s developmental disability services would be more complex than simply increasing workers’ wages, members of a special legislative commission agreed at a meeting May 6.

Kelly Donovan, a commission member who herself receives services, said the work of the support person is “not a job; it’s a commitment.“

In a high-quality system of services, Donovan said, direct support professionals and the people they serve have a relationship. They develop strong bonds.

The discussion nevertheless returned repeatedly to the lack of funding that permeates the system, with rules that commission members say make it rigid and unresponsive to those needing services.

Peter Quattromani, CEO of United Cerebral Palsy of Rhode Island, said agencies that ask their employees to “ commit” to the persons they serve also require them to commit themselves to “a life of poverty” because employers, dependent on state funding, can’t pay salaries commensurate with professional work.

As a result, Quattromani said, the agencies are hiring “very temporary employees.”

“We don’t appreciate what it takes on the part of the individual to turn their life over to a staff person,” Quattromani said. Every time there’s turnover, there’s a new intrusion in that person’s life, he said.

The CEO of West Bay Residential Services, Gloria Quinn, said “I can think of examples when people go along with people and don’t know them. It gets complicated to do the right thing at the right time.”

But West Bay Residential has an annual staff turnover rate of 34 percent and a job vacancy rate of 15 percent, said Quinn, who recommended a system that is adequately funding, “including appropriate compensation for a well-trained workforce.”

At the same time, she said, there are employees who are doing an “incredibly important and skillful job” even without the compensation they deserve.

Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, the commission chairman, said there is a great disparity in pay in two parallel systems of services.

“We do value the profession” of supporting adults with developmental disabilities, he said, as long as it is the state-operated network of group homes and facilities called RICLAS, short for Rhode Island Community Living and Supports. But private providers, who perform the same direct support work, are not valued, DiPalma said, referring to the state’s chronic underfunding of these agencies.

He said he never saw the situation quite that way until Tom Kane, CEO of AccessPoint RI, framed it in those terms during a recent budget hearing before the Senate Finance Committee.

RICLAS workers start at about $18 an hour, while entry-level workers in the private system average about $11.40 an hour. On an annual basis, the starting salary at RICLAS is $37,291, according to a spokeswoman for the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH). As state employees, RICLAS workers also get a full package of benefits.

DiPalma said that when the current fee-for-service reimbursement model was enacted by the General Assembly in 2011, the “right questions weren’t asked. We can’t let that happen again.”

He said he firmly believes that today, all legislators would say they value the work done in supporting adults with developmental disabilities, but “the critical thing is ‘how do we get there’? “ He alluded to a reimbursement model in which wages reflect the value of the work.

In Kelly Donovan’s vision of the future, adults with developmental disabilities will receive training and support in making their own decisions in an informed manner. And support persons will respect those decisions, she said.

Kate Sherlock, a commission member and lawyer with the Rhode Island Disability Law Center, concurred.

For a long time, the role of the staff person has been to “speak up for people,” she said. Instead, staff should facilitate decisions made by clients.

But clients “do not have the real opportunity to decide what they want, because there are not enough options,” Sherlock said. Decisions should not be “either-or,” she said. “It shouldn’t be ‘do you want chocolate or vanilla ice cream.’ “

“People want to live with people they choose. They want a job they like and they want to make a decent amount of money,” Sherlock said.

Enabling clients to make meaningful decisions about belonging to their communities and engaging in activities they want, as well as giving them the opportunity to eat healthy foods and be active and fit will at the same time elevate the staff role into a position that can have greater impact and be more desirable – even fun, Sherlock said.

The Disability Law Center supports a bill that would give legal standing to adults who support those who need assistance in decision-making, Sherlock said, but the measure is encountering difficulties in the Senate. DiPalma said he would look into it.

Commission members agree that Rhode Island needs to abandon its fee-for-service reimbursement system in favor of one that gives clients an annual budget with flexibility to spend it on what they want and need to enable them to live regular lives in their communities, in accordance with a 2014 consent decree and federal Medicaid rules reinforcing the Integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

Not only is the current system under-funded but it is saddled by rules that make it too restrictive, they say.

Among the needs discussed May 6 are funding for:

  • training and career paths for staffers

  • Technology, such as smart phones and other devices and software, that can help clients become more independent from staff.

  • ·Easier access to transportation, which might include Uber and Lyft options to lessen clients’ dependence on staff time, which can be better used providing other types of supports

  • Better access to affordable housing

  • More intensive community-based mental health services that can prevent psychiatric hospitalizations.

In addition, the developmental disabilities caseload must be counted in a way that better informs budget makers, according to Quinn, the CEO of West Bay Residential Services.

All the recommendations which members have presented through May 6 can be found here .

The next meeting will be May 22, when commission members are expected to continue presenting their recommendations.

RI BHDDH Wants Consultants' Comprehensive ‘Best Strategies’ For Integrated DD System

By Gina Macris

The most recent meeting of Rhode Island’s “Project Sustainability” commission Aoril 25 left members surprised by news that an outside review of Rhode Island’s rates and reimbursement methods for private providers of developmental disability services will not conclude with consultants making dollars-and-cents recommendations for a new scale of payments.

In a follow-up question, Developmental Disability News asked officials of the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) to elaborate on the reasons for the approach it has taken in commissioning the outside review, which is intended to help the state meet the requirements of a 2014 federal civil rights decree..

In a statement, a spokesman said the department is looking for the “best strategies” for developing and paying for an “integrated and individualized system of services” - characteristics which would comply with the consent decree.

That decree draws on the authority of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision, which reinforced the integration mandate of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The existing reimbursement system for private agencies led to over-reliance on facility-based care and sheltered workshop employment, in violation of the integration mandate, according to findings of the U.S. Department of Justice, which laid the groundwork for the consent decree. The fee-for-service reimbursement system, called Project Sustainability, resulted to significant pay cuts for direct care workers, high turnover and a high rate of job vacancy.

“Determining how to stabilize the workforce and what to pay direct care workers is a broad question that touches on many moving parts,” said Randal Edgar, the BHDDH spokesman.

The salary of workers, called “direct support professionals,” is an important part of the rate structure, but there are other costs which are “vital to a provider’s enhanced functioning,” Edgar said. He listed these costs:

  • employee benefits

  • training

  • supervision

  • management capacity

  • information technology

  • connection and liaison with community

“Asking the consultants to determine just one of the vital elements would not meet the overall financial needs of the Rhode Island Developmental Disabilities system. We are looking for the consultant to identify best strategies for providing an integrated and individualized system of services and help us develop best strategies to pay for that system. But we do not think it is the consultant’s job to say what direct care workers should be paid,” Edgar said.

Anyone who has questions about the rate review may submit them to BHDDH.AskDD@bhddh.ri.gov, Edgar said. (Please copy and paste the email address.)

Meanwhile, the special legislative commission studying Project Sustainability will meet Monday at 2 p.m. in the Senate Lounge of the State House, according to its chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown.

DiPalma said the session will focus on members’ recommendations for changes to better enable adults with developmental disabilities to live the lives they want with the supports they need.

NESCSO Review of RI DD Reimbursement Won’t Generate Specific New Rate Recommendations

By Gina Macris

Elena Nicolella and Rick Jacobson All Photos By Anne Peters

Elena Nicolella and Rick Jacobson All Photos By Anne Peters

The non-profit consortium hired to review the reimbursements Rhode Island pays private agencies serving adults with developmental disabilities will not produce a new set of recommended rates, its executive director said April 25.

Rather, consultants supervised by the consortium will review the impact of the existing system and present facts and data that will enable the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH) to make more informed policy decisions, based on available funding and other factors, said Elena Nicolella. She is executive director of NESCSO, the New England States Consortium Systems Organization.

Nicolella addressed a special legislative commission studying the current fee-for-service rate structure, called Project Sustainability.

DiPalma and Kelly Donovan, A Consumer Advocate

DiPalma and Kelly Donovan, A Consumer Advocate

For more than an hour, the commission chairman, Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, and other members of the panel peppered Nicolella and consultant Rick Jacobson with questions as they struggled to come up with a clearer idea of what NESCSO’s recommendations might look like.

The pair, aided by BHDDH officials, did flesh out the picture somewhat. But DiPalma, said Nicolella will be invited back in June to give an update on the work, which is underway.

“We will not be issuing recommendations on specific rates,” Nicolella said, explaining that is not within the scope of the work outlined in the contract between NESCSO and BHDDH.

The work will assess current rates quantitatively and qualitatively and analyze “the impact of the rate structure and payment methodology on people receiving services and the provider agencies and make recommendations for the future,” Nicolella said.

NESCSO will develop scenarios or “roadmaps” of what it would take for the state to achieve certain goals, putting the priority on the state’s obligation to meet the requirements of a 2014 civil rights consent decree with the federal government. That means the work will focus on day services and employment supports, at least initially, Nicolella said.

Some of the recommendations, however, will have implications for the entire system of services, she said.

Boss at 4-25 meeting edited.jpg

Rebecca Boss, the BHDDH director, gave an example of one system-wide priority – creating a stable workforce.

She was asked after the meeting why BHDDH structured the work the way it did.

Boss reiterated that NESCSO would present “facts and data” in an analysis based on certain assumptions. She and Nicolella said the policy decisions would be up to BHDDH.

“If the decisions we make (at BHDDH) don’t meet expectations, it will be out there,” Boss said, emphasizing that the work will be transparent.

The assumption at the heart of Project Sustainability was that providers could do the same work with less money. A former BHDDH administration relayed that assumption to the General Assembly in an unsigned memo that contained a slew of reimbursement rate reductions that formed the basis for cuts enacted in 2011 to inaugurate Project Sustainability. The reductions averaged 17 percent.

Boss said “that’s not the kind of assumption we’re talking about.” Instead, the assumption for one analysis might be that industry-wide, providers should have health insurance for their employees, Boss said. Another assumption might be the amount it costs providers to cover employee-related overhead, she said.

In a separate conversation outside the meeting, Nicolella said the recommendations would be “driven by the data” and “not limited by the by the state budget.”

At the same time, NESCSO will “stop short of what was recommended last time,” she said, alluding to the specificity of rates proposed by Burns & Associates, healthcare consultants who worked on Project Sustainability.

In 2011, Burns & Associates recommended rates that would have paid entry-level workers nearly $14 an hour, but after the General Assembly cut $26 million from developmental disability funding, many workers ended up at minimum wage.

Since then, wages have increased only incrementally, resulting in high turnover and job vacancy. Providers say the reimbursement rates do not cover their actual employee-related costs, like payroll taxes, health insurance, and the like.

During the meeting, Nicolella assured a spokeswoman for providers that the rate review will look at the agencies’ figures. At least one agency, Spurwink RI, has laid out its gap in dollars and cents several times before the House Finance Committee.

At the commission meeting, Spurwink’s executive director, Regina Hayes, asked Nicolella and Jacobson whether the review would pay attention to compatibility with current law.

For example, she said, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pay health insurance for workers who put in at least 30 hours a week. But Project Sustainability assumes that only those working 40 hours a week are entitled to health insurance, Hayes said.

Nicolella responded, “That’s exactly the kind of information we should be hearing right now, because it’s extremely helpful.”

She and Jacobson both said the assessment of the impact of the current system will include engagement with consumers and families,as well as providers. But neither of them could lay out a schedule or format for that type of engagement.

NESCSO is required to produce a series of reports for BHDDH between June and December, she said. It is the consortium’s intent to complete the work in time for BHDDH to make its budget request for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2020, Nicolella said.

Nicolella explained that NESCSO’s only mission is to serve the New England states as they seek to research issues and solve problems in the fields of health and human services.

“We are not a consulting company. We don’t sell our services,” she said.

In this case, NESCSO is overseeing four outside consultants, including Jacobson, who are doing the actual work.

NESCSO’s board of directors includes health and human services officials from five of the six New England states, according to its website. Only Maine is not listed as a member.

Nicolella said Rhode Island’s designated board member is Patrick Tigue, the Medicaid director. (Nicolella herself is a former Rhode Island Medicaid director.)

The consortium’s two sources of revenue are state dues and proceeds from a national conference. The BHDDH review is a member benefit, Nicolella said. The contract encompasses not only the work on developmental disabilities but a review of rates for behavioral healthcare services and a model for outpatient services for patients of Eleanor Slater Hospital. But the state still must pay for the consultants’ work - $1.3 million over an 18-month period.

Ongoing RI DD Rate Review To Be Aired Thursday At Project Sustainability Commission Meeting

By Gina Macris

Elena Nicolella, executive director of a non-profit consortium overseeing a review of the rates Rhode Island pays private providers for services to adults wlth developmental disabilities, will address the Project Sustainability Commission Thursday, April 25.

Sen. Louis DiPalma, D-Middletown, the commission chairman, said Nicolella will explain the scope of the work, the timetable, and the documentation that is required under the terms of the consortium’s contract with the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH).

Nicolella is executive director of the New England States Consortium Systems Organization (NESCSO), a non-profit collaboration involving five of the six New England states that aims to promote policies and programs that will serve the needs of the region in a cost-effective manner, according to its website. Only Maine does not belong to the regional group.

DiPalma said he expects that “everything will be on the table” about Project Sustainability, the fee-for-service payment system which providers say hamstrings their ability to offer integrated services in the community as required by a 2014 federal consent decree.

Project Sustainability, enacted by the General Assembly in 2011, forced providers to cut workers’ pay to minimum wage levels, wiping out established career ladders that helped bring continuity to the care of adults with developmental disabilities.

In November, Mark Podrazik, the consultant who advised the state in planning Project Sustainability, told DiPalma’s commission that reimbursement rates should be reviewed every five years.

Thursday’s Project Sustainability Commission meeting featuring Nicolella will begin at 2 p.m. in the Senate Lounge at the State House, according to DiPalma.

NESCSO has a $1.3 million contract with BHDDH over an 18-month period to review private provider rates for developmental disabilities and behavioral healthcare service. The contract also calls on NESCSO to provide technical assistance in connection with creating out-patient services for patients of Eleanor Slater Hospital.

The work in developmental disabilities represents about $700,000 of that total, according to a BHDDH spokeswoman.

RI Consent Decree Coordinator, Tina Spears, To Lead CPNRI, Private Provider Trade Association

Tina Spears * Photo Courtesy CPNRI

Tina Spears * Photo Courtesy CPNRI

By Gina Macris

Tina Spears, who for 16 months has served as Rhode Island’s coordinator for state compliance with a 2014 federal civil rights consent decree affecting adults with developmental disabilities, has resigned to accept a position as executive director of the Community Provider Network of Rhode Island (CPNRI).

Spears’ last day at the Executive Office of Health and Human Services will be Friday, April 12, according to EOHHS spokesman David Levesque.

Spears has broad experience with issues involving developmental disabilities as a parent, advocate and policy maker, emphasizing the importance of the “consumer voice” throughout all her work, according to a statement from a CPNRI spokesman.

Before joining EOHHS as the state’s consent decree coordinator – a position required by the 2014 agreement between the state and the U.S. Department of Justice - she worked as a fiscal analyst for the state Senate, specializing in human service issues.

Spears also has provided direct support for families as a former government relations director of the Rhode Island Parent Information Network.

CPNRI Board members “were pleased to choose Tina from a pool of highly qualified applicants due to her significant experience advocating for people with disabilities and having worked effectively inside and outside state government,” the Board president, Gloria Quinn, said in a statement.

“We are excited to work with Tina as she leads CPNRI through a pivotal moment” in the transformation of the state’s privately-run service system for adults facing intellectual and developmental challenges, said Quinn. She is executive director of West Bay Residential Services, one of 22 private service agencies that make up CPNRI.

Quinn said members of CPNRI “are confident she will take our association to its next level of impact,” resulting in an improved quality of life for adults with developmental disabilities in Rhode Island.

Spears succeeds Donna Martin, who had served as CPNRI’s executive director from 2005 until March 1.

“The state thanks Tina for her commendable service” as consent decree coordinator, “and we look forward to working with Tina in her new position,” Levesque, the EOHHS spokesman, said in a statement.

Brian Gosselin, the chief strategy officer at EOHHS, will serve as the interim consent decree coordinator while the state searches for a permanent successor to Spears, Levesque said. It will be Gosselin’s second stint as interim coordinator.

“The state values the critical role the consent decree coordinator plays in the success of compliance activities of state agencies” in connection to the consent decree, Levesque said.

Counting Gosselin, there have been five consent decree coordinators since the agreement was signed April 8, 2014 and went into effect the following day.

R.I. Tightens Controls In Wake Of Embezzlement Of More Than $220K In DD Client Funds

By Gina Macris

See correction at end of article

A now-deceased Rhode Island state employee embezzled a total of $220,602 from a checking account held in escrow for residents of the state-run group home system, the state’s Office of Internal Audit has reported. 

The employee, Kevin B. Ward, died Nov. 26 at age 60, a few weeks after the State Controller flagged a suspicious transaction from the client checking account Ward controlled on behalf of residents of RICLAS, or Rhode Island Community Living and Supports, a part of the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH).. 

Rhode Island State Police investigated a suspicious death of a BHDDH employee last November that was ruled a suicide, according to a statement a state police spokeswoman made to the Providence Journal Dec. 13. 

On April 8, the spokeswoman, Laura Meade Kirk, said State Police could make no additional comment apart from the fact that its investigation closed without criminal charges. 

State officials have described the situation involving Ward’s death as tragic

“While no RICLAS program recipients were directly affected, this is a tragic situation for many of our state employees who knew and worked with the late Kevin Ward,” said BHDDH director Rebecca Boss after the state Office of Internal Audit completed its report April 3. Ward had been a financial manager for RICLAS from February, 2005 until his death. 

The state has made good on the funds belonging to the RICLAS residents and has recouped more than $70,000 from its insurance company, according to a spokeswoman for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The state also is exploring legal avenues to recover the rest of the money. 

The suspicious activity was discovered Nov. 2 by the state’s Controller, who, along with the Treasurer’s Office, was in the midst of a broader effort to tighten internal controls over the custody of state-owned checking accounts, the director of the Office of Internal Audit, Dorothy Pascale, wrote in an April 3 memo to Boss.

The OMB spokeswoman, Brenna McCabe, elaborated: 

Since November, the state’s Office of “Accounts and Control has worked with our finance units across all agencies to implement and reinforce measures to help prevent this from happening again.” 

Among other oversight and control measures, she said, new rules require two persons to sign checks and prevent those who signed the checks from cashing them. 

Ward had been authorized both to sign and cash checks on behalf of the State of Rhode Island.

According to Pascale’s memo, Ward transferred money from the RICLAS’ residents’ account to another, long-dormant, state-owned RICLAS checking account at Bank of America, and from there, to his own Citizens Bank checking account. 

Ward had complete control over the Bank of America account that paid directly into his own Citizens Bank account. He even received the account statements from Bank of America.  

Pascale said investigators found records of 21 checks totaling $220,602 payable to Kevin B. Ward that were deposited in Ward’s Citizens Bank checking account from August, 2011 to November, 2018. The check that triggered the investigation had been made out to Ward for $4,500 on June 20, 2017 but was not spotted for more than 16 months. 

On August 1, 2011, the state-owned Bank of America account had a balance of $38,476, but the bank does not retain records longer than seven years, so investigators were not able to gather evidence of account activity prior to that date, Pascale said.

Ward skimmed funds from a client account containing social security-related income used to help pay for the state’s cost of operating RICLAS facilities, in effect serving as contributions toward room, board, utilities and the like.

An earlier version of this article incorrectly described the purpose of the client account.